Home > Eureka California, Lawsuits > Eureka Police lose big in Martin Cotton case

Eureka Police lose big in Martin Cotton case

Martin Cotton and daughter, Siehna.

A lawsuit brought against Eureka Police for the 2007 death of Martin Cotton II was unanimously decided by an Oakland jury today in favor Cotton’s family.

Verbena Lea attended the trial and told KMUD news that Cotton’s young daughter, Siehna, was awarded $1,250,000 for the pain and suffering inflicted on Cotton and $2,750,000 for wrongful death.

The jury also found that the conduct of Eureka Police Officers Justin Winkle, Gary Whitmer and Adam Laird “shocked the conscience” and thereby awarded Martin Cotton Sr. $500,000.

In addition the jury awarded punitive damages for which the officers will be personally liable.  Laird and Winkle were ordered to pay $30,000 each while Whitmer is on the hook for $15,000.

The family’s attorney Vicki Sarmiento said Cotton, 26, died from blunt force trauma to the head and would have survived with medical attention. Cotton died after being taken to the Humboldt County jail after an altercation with police and others at the Eureka Rescue Mission.

Eureka Mayor Frank Jager was coroner at the time of Cotton’s death and initially tried to blame it on an overdose of LSD.

  1. Anonymous
    September 23, 2011 at 8:25 pm

    I’m not convinced the death was caused by EPD’s involvement and not the earlier altercation, but there’s no shortage of reasons to dislike EPD right now, so I’m not losing sleep over this verdict. Eureka is suffering from a credibility crisis right now.

  2. Anonymous
    September 23, 2011 at 8:38 pm

    “Eureka Mayor Frank Jager was coroner at the time of Cotton’s death and tried to blame it on an overdose of LSD.”

    You’re really going there, H?

  3. September 23, 2011 at 8:40 pm

    What is the possibility of something coming back on Jager? If he was privy to the autopsy report, which, as CORONER, he was, he would have known that LSD, which isn’t in itself ever fatal, wasn’t the cause of death; and yet, in saying so, it would appear that he attempted to cover up the true cause of death.

  4. tra
    September 23, 2011 at 8:51 pm

    And once again, Eureka taxpayers will pay bigtime for wrongdoing by members of the EPD.

  5. Anonymous
    September 23, 2011 at 8:53 pm

    Face it. Jager wanted a result which would exonerate his buddies. He’s a cop, not a doctor.

  6. Mr. Candid
    September 23, 2011 at 8:58 pm

    Frank Jager is a liar. That’s your answer.

  7. Anonymous
    September 23, 2011 at 9:09 pm

    It’s time for the people of Eureka to stop paying taxes to the city until we clean up the corruption in our government and get a professional police force. My god! How much more crap are we expected to take?

  8. Anonymous
    September 23, 2011 at 9:12 pm

    The money can’t replace Martin Cotton but I’m glad his family won’t have financial worries.

  9. Hank Sims
    September 23, 2011 at 9:20 pm

    This wasn’t what happened.

    The kooky medical examiner tried to blame Cotton’s death on LSD overdose; Jager rejected that and wrote it up as subdural hematoma.

  10. Psign
    September 23, 2011 at 9:25 pm

    Possible rare LSD overdose in Cotton death
    Thadeus Greenson/The Times-Standard
    Eureka Times Standard
    Article Launched:08/24/2007 09:21:58 AM PDT

    Martin Cotton II had a potentially lethal dose of LSD in his system when he died in custody on Aug. 9, according to a toxicology report released Thursday.

    Toxicology tests done by Central Valley Toxicology in Fresno show Cotton had 10.6 nanograms of LSD per milliliter of blood in his system, 10 times what is considered potentially toxic and twice what is considered potentially fatal, according to Humboldt County Coroner Frank Jager.

    The official cause of death will be determined by Ken Falconer, the doctor who performed Cotton’s autopsy, and it will probably be released next week, Jager said.

    ”Since I’ve been coroner here, I’ve never seen someone overdose on LSD, so this is pretty unusual, if that’s what it is,” Jager said. “It’s just not very common. I don’t know how he got that much in his system.”

    Craig Hill, senior program manager for Mental Health Branch Dual Recovery Programs, said LSD is rare in Humboldt County, and overdoses are exceptionally rare anywhere.

    ”There’s been possibly eight cases of overdose ever, and all of those are controversial at best,” Hill said, but added that he’d never heard of a dose as high as the one reportedly in Cotton’s system. “Just about everything we know about LSD goes out the window because of how much he had on board.”

    Cotton died in custody just hours after being involved in several altercations in front of the Eureka Rescue Mission, including one with Eureka police officers. From many accounts, Cotton was agitated and combative from the moment he arrived at the mission.

    The Eureka Police Department was criticized by some in the ensuing weeks for not taking Cotton directly to the hospital after the altercation. Some have also alleged that officers on the scene used excessive force.

    In a statement released Thursday, Eureka Police Chief Garr Nielsen said while Cotton’s death was tragic, the toxicology report reaffirms his view that his officers acted appropriately given the situation.

    ”In this particular case, Mr. Cotton was so highly impaired and his actions so violent that it was impossible for law enforcement to subdue him peacefully,” Nielsen said in the statement.

    Thadeus Greenson can be reached at 441-0509 or tgreenson@times-standard.com.

  11. September 23, 2011 at 9:27 pm

    This wasn’t what happened.

    The kooky medical examiner tried to blame Cotton’s death on LSD overdose; Jager rejected that and wrote it up as subdural hematoma.

    You’re right.

  12. Hank Sims
    September 23, 2011 at 9:27 pm

    Hmm. Well, that is not how I remember it, but since you found the better source material I will withdraw.

  13. September 23, 2011 at 9:33 pm

    From the NCJ:

    Ken Falconer, the doctor who performed Cotton’s autopsy, said on Monday that he and Humboldt County Coroner Frank Jager have not quite worked out the exact wording of the cause of death in the Cotton case, but Falconer is certain it was an overdose of LSD. As certain as one can be, that is. “In this business, you do the best you can,” he said…

    The toxicology report, which was released late last week, indicated that Cotton had 10.6 nanograms per milliliter of LSD in his blood, a level which Jager said was twice the lethal dose.

  14. September 23, 2011 at 9:33 pm

    The horror of it all …

  15. Hank Sims
    September 23, 2011 at 9:37 pm

    Here’s Japhet Weeks’ story from when the official death report was filed.

    Thad’s story is written back before that, at the moment the kooky medical examiner submitted his original autopsy report. Again: I personally remember Jager being far more skeptical of that autopsy report than Thad’s story indicates, but I have no citation for that.

  16. September 23, 2011 at 9:38 pm

    Times-Standard 8/29/2007:

    From all accounts, Cotton’s tangle with the police was violent, and officers used pepper spray, batons, kicks and punches to subdue him. Humboldt County Coroner Frank Jager said after Cotton’s autopsy that physical injuries to Cotton’s body were extensive, but were not believed to be the cause of death.

  17. Psign
    September 23, 2011 at 9:43 pm

    Apparent ‘LSD overdose’ victim dies of ‘blunt force trauma’
    Just in case you were sitting on the edge of your seat, avidly awaiting news about the so-called LSD overdose… well, relax.

    Humboldt County Coroner Frank Jäger announced Thursday that Martin Frederick Cotton II died from a subdural hematoma, or collection of blood on the surface of his brain, the result of blunt force trauma to his head.
    Cotton, 26, died Aug. 9 after less than two hours at the Humboldt County jail following a series of fights, including one with officers from the Eureka Police Department.

    An autopsy Aug. 13 revealed evidence of blunt force trauma, but stopped short of determining his cause of death.

    Of course, they’re still going to list “potentially toxic levels” of LSD as a contributing factor in his death, but it seems clear that whole diagnosis was silly from the outset. Granted, when you stop to think about Cotton’s behavior, it’s not unreasonable to imagine that LSD might have contributed in some fashion. This, for instance, never particularly sounded like rational behavior:

    A surveillance video from inside the jail reportedly shows movements by Cotton inside his cell that suggest he might have repeatedly banged his head against a wall.
    The video has not been made public, but Jäger said the pathologists watched it and were unable to draw any firm conclusions from it.

    Maybe that’s due to the fact that, according to an earlier report:

    Humboldt County Sheriff Gary Philp said the sobering cell that held Cotton was equipped with padded floors, walls and dividers, making the report that Cotton died from injuries sustained while banging his head against the cell floor seem improbable.
    In the end, the actual manner of death could not be concluded – the investigators couldn’t make up their minds if this was a case of “natural death, homicide, suicide, [or] accident.” Seems weird to me that someone could wind up in police custody and yet nobody could pin down how he died… oh wait, that doesn’t actually seem weird at all. The moral of the story: stay off the drugs, kids! High doses of LSD have been associated with subdural hematomas! It’s not safe!

    » more at: http://www.eurekareporter.com

  18. Hank Sims
    September 23, 2011 at 9:45 pm

    Yeah. Well, seeing as how they’re pretty solidly in agreement I’m inclined to trust Japhet’s and Thad’s reports from that period over my own memory.

    Disregard previous, except for the fact that Jager did call it a subdural hematoma rather than an LSD overdose, contrary to the medical examiner’s autopsy report. Eventually, at least.

  19. September 23, 2011 at 10:15 pm

    Ohhhhhhhhhh-Yeeeeeess!

  20. Anonymous
    September 23, 2011 at 10:27 pm

    According to several reports I’ve read, the officers’ testimony directly contradicted Nancy Delaney’s opening statement at trial, stating that Cotton did not appear to be on drugs, reacted normally to pepper spray, wasn’t armed or trying to get away, that the exhaustive beating and pepper spraying was to get his hands out from under him. Witnesses described a horrific beating with metal batons and head slams against concrete.

    What consequences should these officers face besides the monetary award? Is that paid by them personally, by the city or is there an insurance policy that covers gross misconduct?

  21. Solid
    September 23, 2011 at 10:32 pm

    These three officers employment needs to be terminated ASAP are you paying attention Murl?.

  22. tra
    September 23, 2011 at 10:48 pm

    The way I remember it evolving pretty much follows the narrative that has been pieced together in this thread — both the medical examiner and Jager publicly advanced the “LSD overdose” theory, but later Jager backed off and listed the cause of death as a physical injury.

    As I recall, what happened in the interim was quite a bit of backlash and ridicule of the “LSD overdose” theory, and some embarassing backpedaling by Jager.

    Meanwhile, however, the damage was done in the sense that a lot of people heard the “LSD overdose” theory and that’s what stuck in their minds. However, it looks like the jury in this case was unimpressed with that theory…about $4.5 million dollars worth of unimpressed.

    Now consider this: How much improved supervision at the shelter and improved training of police officers and jail personnel, and how much substance abuse treatment and mental health crisis intervention work could have been achieved with $4.5 million. Seems to me that the answer is quite a lot.

  23. Anonymous
    September 23, 2011 at 10:57 pm

    I’m surprised the insurance companies that end up paying these sort of jury awards don’t insist on a certain level of officer training before accepting a city as a client. When I apply for health insurance, they care whether I’m overweight, have high blood pressure or smoke, but is there no similar analysis regarding the health of a police force before it gets an insurance plan accepted?

  24. Pilgrim 218
    September 24, 2011 at 5:00 am

    So, who pays those huge settlements, the City of Eureka??

  25. September 24, 2011 at 6:11 am

    Side effects of law enforcement. The imprisonment of young people while they were on “trips” unquestionably contributed to adverse effects. One well-known example occurred on June 21, 1967, when 5,000 tablets of the LSD-like drug STP were distributed without charge at a celebration in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. Scores of young people suffered bad trips; 60 of the 5,000 users came to professional attention. Of the 60, 32 were treated at the Haight-Ashbury Medical Clinic. “All but one of these 32 patients were returned to their homes or to the care of their friends within a few hours, following explanation and very mild sedation,” 5 Dr. David E. Smith subsequently reported. Seven other users, however, were arrested and imprisoned–– and then, as their symptoms grew worse, were taken to the San Francisco General Hospital. They suffered much more severe and prolonged illnesses. “Our hypothesis is,” Dr. Smith explained, “that these patients differed from those seen at the Clinic, not so much in the intensity of their reaction as in its management. In the supportive atmosphere of the room of a friend or the Clinic, the patient recognized the drug-induced nature of his experience. If he was incarcerated, his paranoid, hallucinatory behavior was intensified and prolonged.”
    1972 Consumers Union LICIT AND ILLICIT DRUGS

  26. September 24, 2011 at 7:12 am

    The city of Eureka is liable for $4 million while the officers are personally on the hook for the punitive damages of $75,000.

  27. Richard
    September 24, 2011 at 8:07 am

    Jager may have backed off his examiner’s unsubstantiated and novel theory once it was clear that no such overdose had ever been recorded in the fifty plus year history of LSD, but that does not change the fact that Jager is first and foremost a cop and was eager to jump at any chance to cover his former fellow officers backs.

    We now have two other former law enforcement officers on the Eureka City Council, and not coincidentally, these are the same folks who worked with Tyson to orchestrate and ultimately approve of the firing of the reformer police chief Garr Nielsen.

    Eureka has fully embraced the Good Ol’ Boys and their Thin Blue Line mentality in the last election and now they’ve got Merl Harpham as acting chief. I don’t think you can get any more “old boy” then that.

    Except more of the same, and more lawsuits to follow.

  28. Plain Jane
    September 24, 2011 at 8:19 am

    No insurance policy to cover police brutality, Heraldo?

  29. September 24, 2011 at 8:25 am

    I imagine insurers frown on verdicts that include punitive damages.

  30. skippy
    September 24, 2011 at 8:42 am

    Excerpts from Thadeus Greenson’s Times-Standard article, “Jury Finds Eureka Liable for Cotton’s Death—Estate awarded $4.5 million for 2007 In-Custody Death” this morning:

    … A FEDERAL JURY in Oakland found that two EPD officers used excessive force against Cotton, that three officers were deliberately indifferent to his medical needs, and that Eureka failed to adequately train its officers in obtaining medical care for arrestees who have had force used against them. The jury also found that three EPD officers acted “maliciously, oppressively or in reckless disregard” of Cotton’s constitutional rights…

    “THE JURY found that EPD officers Adam Laird and Justin Winkle used excessive force against Cotton, while officer Gary Whitmer did not. The jury found that Laird, Whitmer, and Winkle were “deliberately indifferent” to Cotton’s serious medical needs when they failed to get him medical treatment before booking him into the jail.

    “THE JURY ALSO found that the City failed to adequately train its police officers in obtaining medical care for arrestees who have had force used against them and that the officers involved acted “maliciously, oppressively, or in reckless disregard” of Cotton’s constitutional rights. In the wake of the incident, (EPD Chief) Nielsen changed EPD policy to require any suspect involved in an altercation—with police or others—be treated and evaluated by a medical professional before being booked….

    “WHEN INITIALLY FILED, the claim sought unspecified damages in an amount large enough to act as a deterrent. The claim stated…”because of the severity of the unlawful actions of the above named defendants, damages must be set in an amount sufficient to resound through officialdom and to deter such depraved and unlawful conduct.” Cotton’s estate also brought suit against the County of Humboldt but that portion of the suit was settled… the County paid Cotton’s estate $100,000 under the settlement, according to CAO Phillip Smith-Hanes. …Humboldt County refused numerous media and California Public Records requests seeking disclosure of the (jail surveillance) video, citing security concerns.

    “REPRESENTATIVES OF EUREKA — including City Manager David Tyson, Interim Police Chief Murl Harpham and local attorney Nancy Delaney, who is representing the City in the case — could not be reached for comment.”

  31. Rooster Cogburn
    September 24, 2011 at 8:44 am

    It is obvious to us thinking residents that we live here in Eureka in one of the most corrupt little cities on the entire West Coast. The corruption, incompetence and brutality shown by the EPD under the likes of Douglas, Harpham, Zanotti et al are just reflections of the corruption, incompetence, cronyism and brutality of the Tyson reign of terror. A decade of intentional disregard for a modern police department has led to these verdicts with more to come.

    It is time to fire Tyson for cause.

  32. Plain Jane
    September 24, 2011 at 8:46 am

    What about the $4+ million the city has to pay and the county settlement of $100,000, Heraldo?

    Are these 3 officers still on EPD payroll?

  33. September 24, 2011 at 8:52 am

    Jane, I don’t know for sure but look forward to learning whether the city’s insurance will pay for police conduct that “shocks the conscience.”

  34. Goldie
    September 24, 2011 at 8:56 am

    A family has lost a son and a father, the city of Eureka has suffered another needless huge financial hit and the man at the helm, Mr. Tyson should be strongly invited to leave before he selects the next chief of police.

  35. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 8:56 am

    I hope this doesn’t effect the zoo.

  36. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 9:03 am

    It’s notable that the county in whose custody Cotton died settled before trial for only $100,000, but the city chose a jury trial.

  37. Goldie
    September 24, 2011 at 9:08 am

    “A rare award of punitive damages against the three officers required a finding of “malice, oppression, or reckless disregard” to the decedent’s or plaintiffs’ rights, for which the jury assessed $30,000 from officer Winkle, $30,000 from officer Laird, and $15,000 from officer Whitmer, who arrived at the scene late but joined in on the beating.” http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2011/09/23/18691150.php

  38. Also Notable
    September 24, 2011 at 9:11 am

    It is quite notable, the apparent incompetence of the city’s attorney Delaney. She seemlingly had no idea what her own witnesses were going to say. It is completely whack. Either she didn’t interview them and prepare properly for trial or her presentation was based on anti homeless right wing ideology so whacky that even cops couldn’t follow it.

    Makes you wonder about nature of the Tyson – Delaney nexis.

  39. Plain Jane
    September 24, 2011 at 9:14 am

    Wasn’t Nancy also the attorney for the county in the pepper spray case?

  40. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 9:14 am

    does she drive a red SUV?

  41. Omnomnonimous
    September 24, 2011 at 9:22 am

    I’ve always sort of doubted the veracity or accuracy of that toxicology report. LSD levels in his blood 10x greater than any ever recorded? The probability of error in the measurement of such a concentration would seem at least as great as the probability that such a dose could occur. Has anybody done the math on how many sheets of blotter he’d have had to swallowed?

  42. September 24, 2011 at 9:24 am

    Wasn’t Nancy also the attorney for the county in the pepper spray case?

    Yes. While she loses cases for the city and county, she consoles herself with a bulging bank account.

  43. Billy
    September 24, 2011 at 9:27 am

    Eureka: cursed since 1860

  44. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 9:30 am

    Q, If Eureka is so corrupt and unsafe for its people, which local city is better?

    A. Maybe Blue Lake? Ferndale?

    Q. Are local people in greater danger from our police and sheriffs or from our local criminals?

    A. Obviously, from our local criminals. They kill a lot more of us than the cops do.

  45. September 24, 2011 at 9:34 am

    Is that an excuse for police conduct that “shocks the conscience?”

  46. tra
    September 24, 2011 at 9:36 am

    Then-EPD Chief Garr Nielsen was adamant that his officers acted appropriately when faced with a violent, noncompliant suspect, who toxicology reports later showed was under the influence of a high dose of LSD at the time of the altercation. Cotton, Nielsen maintained, was very alive and very combative when EPD officers booked him into the Humboldt County jail.

    In the wake of the incident, however, Nielsen changed EPD policy to require that any suspect involved in an altercation — with police or others — be treated and evaluated by a medical professional before being booked into jail.

    http://www.times-standard.com/localnews/ci_18969038

    In fairness to Nielsen, I think this took place very early in his tenure, before the new chief had much of a chance to change the culture of the EPD, institute better training, etc.

    But it looks like, at least according to the findings of this jury, he was seriously in error in defending the actions of these officers as “appropriate.”

  47. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 9:43 am

    How sad to see you trolls at play. EPD,bad on this and several other issues. Heraldonuts trying to spin everything are like tics sucking blood. BAD TOO! LSD,bad too. Cotton,sad to see anyone die like this, was trouble every where he went. All-in-all, a bad combination.

  48. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 10:10 am

    EPD had a long history of excessive force, there is no denying that, based upon the incidents which have been widely reported. Nielsen had been chief only four months when this occurred and surely shouldnt be held responsible for a culture which has existed for years and is so His remarks were made based on what was reported to him, the jail video, and witness statements. I am sure he later realized that in all likelyhood the officers did use excessive force. He tried to change the culture and was fired for his efforts by the “good ole boys”. The officers involved were trained in the prevailing culture so I am surprised that they would be held personally liable. They knew no better, as that how “business” is done by EPD. But the City and EPD deserve this verdict and should be braced for more until they fundamentally change the way they do business. They are lucky Sheri Moore didnt have anyone to sue on her behalf. And Nancy Delaney is responsible for defending the prevailing the “good ole boy” environment which exists in Eureka, and for condoning the actions of EPD. Ultimately, the responsibility rests with the guy at the top (Tyson) who did not have the fortitude to allow the changes to be made at EPD that Nielsen was committed to.

  49. September 24, 2011 at 10:29 am

    Has anybody done the math on how many sheets of blotter he’d have had to swallowed? H.

    Whose blotter? Owsley’s?

    “A good drug is a drug where the LD50 is 200 times more than the effective dose. In the case of LSD, the LD50 for man has never been determined. That’s how safe LSD is. We’re talking about lethality here, not you know.” Terrence McKenna

  50. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 10:41 am

    I wish I could get $500,000 every time Frank and his buddies shocked my conscience. Even $50.

  51. September 24, 2011 at 10:41 am

    The whole LSD story is sketchy.

    Martin may have ingested some LSD or not.

    It is curious that the LSD theory was not advanced by Jager or other law enforcement until after a well known street person here in Eureka (I forget his name) started circulating the story that Martin had ingested a large amount of LSD. It was not clear at all at the time and still isn’t that this person could have known whether or not Martin had ingested such.. It is curious that while homicide victims are often tested for meth, heroin and cocaine they are very rarely tested for LSD.

    It was only after Jager and the rest floated the superhuman strength meth monster trial balloon and failed that they trotted out the LSD story.

    Supposedly Martin had obtained a vial of liquid LSD in the several hours between his release from jail (with no money) and his beating death. No vial has ever been found. Sure he may have swallowed the acid but he didn’t eat the vial. No witness has ever come forth to substanitate the LSD component of the story, except for this dubious lab report from Fresno.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  52. tra
    September 24, 2011 at 10:53 am

    Martin may have ingested some LSD or not

    My guess is that the answer is probably yes, he ingested it (as opposed to a false positive test or a conspiracy involving the testing lab).

    But what I’m less sure of is when he ingested it (a) before he was released from the Humboldt County Jail, (b) during the 2 1/2 hours he was out of jail and before the incident at the Rescue Mission, or (c) after he was back in police custody.

    Does anyone know whether there was any testimony at the trial as to when and where he allegedly got the LSD? Does the lab test give any indication of when the drug was taken, or is that not something they can tell from the test?

  53. September 24, 2011 at 11:03 am

    As far as conspiracy theory, tra, his cadaver could have been injected with LSD anytime after he died so your conspiracy theory need not be limited to a lab in Fresno.

    On the other hand, a glass vial could have been smashed in the melee and he could have absorbed it through his skin or open wounds/abrasions.. Was his clothing tested for LSD?

    We just don’t know.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  54. Auntie Arkley
    September 24, 2011 at 11:05 am

    The corrupt assholes who run Eureka fired Nielsen who was implementing changes in the EPD to minimize these types of incidents. We can look forward to more incidents like this in the future. It’s called Good Ol’ Boy Justice.

  55. tra
    September 24, 2011 at 11:20 am

    Bill,

    If they were going to fake a lab report to show drugs that weren’t present, why wouldn’t they have stuck with the methamphetamine angle, and just phonied up the lab reports to show high levels of meth instead of high levels of LSD?

    Meth and fear of meth-related violence are much more in the forefront of people’s consciousness these days than LSD, and presumably would have made a much more plausible excuse for why the officers “had to” use so much brutal force against Martin. In other words, why cook up such a weak cover story that would be so likely to fall apart later (the LSD story), as opposed to a cover story that many people might well have believed (the methamphetamine story).

    I think it’s more likely that Martin did have LSD in his system, and that the medical examiner and Jager hoped to take advantage of that fact and claim that the LSD was the direct cause of death, because of course that would have been quite convenient for the cops, the City, and the County.

    As far as your question “but where’s the vial?” I don’t think that’s really the most compelling objection to the story. Because a vial could very easily have been dropped in the weeds somewhere, down any storm drain or any number of other places, with little to no chance of it being found. It wouldn’t have been found unless he still had it on him or right nearby at the time of the incident at the Rescue Mission, I mean it’s not like they searched every trash can and patch of weeds or shrubs and dredged every sewer drain and searched the ocean floor along the waterfront looking for it. So it seems to me that the fact that the vial is missing is probably just not that significant.

    But as I wrote above, I am very curious about when and under what circumstances he may have ingested the LSD.

  56. tra
    September 24, 2011 at 11:28 am

    His cavader could have been injected with LSD anytim after he died, so your conspiracy theory need not be limited to a lab in Fresno.

    Wouldn’t the heart have to be beating for the injected LSD to be dispersed through the bloodstream and therefore present when a blood sample was taken?

    Again, it seems much more likely to me that he would have ingested it while he was alive.

  57. September 24, 2011 at 11:29 am

    The meth story yarn was ruled out quickly as I remember they had a prelim tox screen quickly within days that showed no meth in his system. So they had to walk that back quickly, that’s when they trotted out the LSD story.

    I knew Martn personally. I never knew him to use acid or any hard drug, only some pot once in a while and a beer a few times a month. He didn’t have enough money to buy the beer and he wouldn’t steal it or panhandle. He was also fairly intelligent. I can’t see him being dumb enough to swallow a vial of liquid acid even if he was afraid of getting caught with it. He had just been in jail for almost a month. Caught with a little acid in Humboldt? He would have got Prop 36. no big deal. Martin was not a dangerous criminal, he had no record of any real crime at all. He was just a lost young man.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  58. September 24, 2011 at 11:37 am

    tra- “Wouldn’t the heart have to be beating for the injected LSD to be dispersed through the bloodstream and therefore present when a blood sample was taken? ”

    Do they test the blood from the entire body when they do postmortem tox screens? I doubt it. Probably just one sample from the heart or liver. But I could be wrong. Its the kind of detail a medical examiner would have handy I would imagine.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  59. tra
    September 24, 2011 at 11:50 am

    Well I agree with your original statement that

    The whole LSD story is sketchy.

  60. tra
    September 24, 2011 at 11:56 am

    Do they test the blood from the entire body…?

    My assumption was that they just take a blood sample from an artery or vein, but I don’t really know. But my point was that unless they injected the LSD right at the spot where the sample was taken later, then if his heart wasn’t pumping to distribute the LSD throughout his system, how would it show up in the sample?

  61. September 24, 2011 at 12:11 pm

    I understand tra, but my point is there might be a standard protocol on the location of such a post mortem blood draw, like the heart or liver, rather than in some random location in some random vein or artery. Would such a protocol not be likely given the state of the art?

    And if so, it follows that some informed person would know where to place such an injection.

    I am not saying that this is what happened, just that it is possible, and the the whole LSD angle to this tragedy may be sketchy. It is all based on the testimony of a person who is known by LE and his homeless brethren alike to be schizophrenic. That’s why he wasn’t called as a witness.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  62. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 12:12 pm

    But my point was that unless they injected the LSD right at the spot where the sample was taken later, then if his heart wasn’t pumping to distribute the LSD throughout his system, how would it show up in the sample?

    I’m not suggesting the cops injected him with LSD, but actually if they did and then took the blood sample from the same area, that would go a long way toward explaining the anomalously high concentration they reported.

    When any data point is such an outlier as to question its believability, it’s usually a good practice to ask where that data point came from and verify its accuracy before blindly accepting it. I never did see that figure questioned, it was always just assumed the guy ate an inconceivable amount of acid within 3 hours of being sprung from jail without any money in his pockets.

  63. Sherlock
    September 24, 2011 at 12:25 pm

    Having the sample itself contaminated directly with LSD would explain it’s presence and level in the report. Elementary.

  64. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 12:29 pm

    If Sherlock is correct, and he always is, the county sure got off easy.

  65. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 12:55 pm

    tra la la

  66. Louie
    September 24, 2011 at 12:57 pm

    R.I.P Martin Cotton. I wished i had not witnessed this horrible incident, but im glad i made a difference for the family. Out of 60 witnesses…2 had the balls to step forward. All those people should be ashamed of themselves along with the EPD, Sherrifs station, Coroner, DA, Mayor, City council and the Rescue mission. At least a few people cared that this person didnt die in vain! Screw you Eureka!

  67. September 24, 2011 at 12:58 pm

    Auntie Arkley says:
    September 24, 2011 at 11:05 am
    The corrupt assholes who run Eureka fired Nielsen who was implementing changes in the EPD to minimize these types of incidents. We can look forward to more incidents like this in the future. It’s called Good Ol’ Boy Justice.

    Actually, it’s called class warfare that requires a gang to do an arrest. In Humboldt County, Eureka specifically, it’s called Murl Harpham’s “tough cop” solution. It’s what you get when you keep voting in conservative, literalistic believers – mostly Republican wannabe Elitists.It’s what I call karma.

  68. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 3:11 pm

    To those who did step forward to testify , deepest appreciation.

  69. Dick
    September 24, 2011 at 4:25 pm

    Tyson should fire Neilson tomorrow.

  70. Dick
    September 24, 2011 at 4:26 pm

    …or Friday.

  71. Dick
    September 24, 2011 at 5:28 pm

    Joe, your an ass. It is not karma that Cotton took acid, fought the cops, died and scored a huge payoff for his family at the taxpayer’s expense.
    This started with Cotton, not the judge. not the jury, not the cops.
    Liberals are always blaming others for their own behavior.
    So let’s hear you blame me for your ass holiness.

  72. wurking stiff
    September 24, 2011 at 5:48 pm

    Well Dick, i guess the name says it all.

    BTW- to paraphrase this jackass i read today:

    Cops are always blaming others for their own behavior.

  73. William Verick
    September 24, 2011 at 6:00 pm

    Come on. If the dose stated above 10.6 nanograms per milliliter of blood is correct, here’s how the math works. There would be approximately one microgram of LSD per deciliter of blood or ten micrograms per liter of blood. There are about five liters of blood in a grown man’s body. So that means the dose was 50 micrograms. That is not a very stiff dose of LSD. A classic tab of Owsley Acid was about 500 micrograms.

  74. Ants Alive!
    September 24, 2011 at 6:03 pm

    Well “Dick” the three cops who testified, testified that Cotton was not fighting them, he was not resisting. There goes that theory, genuis.

    Sure I know if you keep repeating a lie you figure enough people will believe it……..

  75. William Verick
    September 24, 2011 at 6:08 pm

    I suppose the cops are going to say that society did this to them.

  76. Anonymous
    September 24, 2011 at 8:51 pm

    Another prime example of the fact that you must take your court case out of Humboldt county to receive justice. Next the court clerk will call the plaintiffs and tell them an appeal has been filed because a “Humboldt county judge hasn’t heard the case.”

  77. SmokeMonster
    September 24, 2011 at 10:47 pm

    Dick I blame Tyson for costing the tax payers more than any Eureka liberal ever has.

    When will enough be enough? When will the people notice what’s really going on….Maybe Joel will man up and use his position of power(ha) to doodle a drawring of Tyson,Jager and the rest of the clown council…no he’ll stick to stereotyping the local civillians

  78. September 24, 2011 at 10:58 pm

    Joel took up Jager and the Council last year.

    The Tale of Two Richards was another good one.

    Don’t forget the Bass/Neely/Leonard campaign contribution cartoon.

  79. Anonymous
    September 25, 2011 at 8:50 am

    it’s easy to blame the cops but as I heard it Martin got out of jail, ingested a bunch of LSD, and then went down to the free meal and started fights and attacking the people there! The cops were called because Martin was attacking and fighting with others for no apparent reason.

    It’s too easy to blame the cops.

  80. Plain Jane
    September 25, 2011 at 9:08 am

    It’s easy to blame the cops because they beat an unarmed man to death to “get his hands from under him.” If his hands were “under him” he couldn’t have even been defending himself. If there had been no civilian witnesses, this would have been swept under the rug as self-inflicted or cops acting in self-defense. People, like you, who try to justify such brutality are pretty easy to blame as well. Tolerating brutality by authorities allows it to thrive.

  81. Latte Tude
    September 25, 2011 at 9:52 am

    The question for today, and it is for Interim Chief Harpham, is “Have these three cops been fired yet?”

    The average Eureka family of four just got handed a tax bill of $600.00 and we can’t afford cops any more whose behavior “shocks the conscience.”

    How about it Chief Harpham, will we read in tomorrow’s T-S that these rogue cops have been terminated? Or not?

  82. tra
    September 25, 2011 at 9:56 am

    It’s too easy to blame the cops

    Martin was responsible for Martin’s behavior, and the cops are responsible for their behavior. Is that so hard to understand?

  83. September 25, 2011 at 10:10 am

    The community employing the cops bears the responsibility for police. The Eureka community is currently managed by retired cops, though of course it is the public that will pay one way or another.

    Was Mr. Cotton so responsible for his own behavior he deserved to die at the hands of the police? Is tra a tea-partier in drag?

  84. Anonymous
    September 25, 2011 at 10:21 am

    Tyson replaced Nielsen with Harpham, enough said. Get a clue people. This behavior is condoned by Harpham, you will hear no apologies from him.

  85. tra
    September 25, 2011 at 12:20 pm

    humboldturtle said “Was Mr. Cotton so responsible for his own behavior he deserved to die at the hands of the police?”

    Slow down, turtle!

    That’s not what I was getting at.

    The italicized words in my 9:56 comment

    It’s too easy to blame the cops

    was a quote from Anonymous 8:50. Sorry I didn’t make that clear.

    My response at 9:56 was intended to point out to 8:50, that whatever Martin’s actions were, the cops retain responsibility for their own behavior. Obviously the jury agreed.

  86. tra
    September 25, 2011 at 12:24 pm

    Oh, and turtle, I agree that the community as a whole, and to an even greater degree the leadership of the city and in particular the leadership of the police department, also share some of the reponsibility when things like this happen — especially when it is a chronic problem, with numerous incidents of excessive force being used.

  87. September 25, 2011 at 1:18 pm

    Sounds like murder to me.

  88. September 25, 2011 at 2:39 pm

    CORONER–qualificatons????

  89. SmokeMonster
    September 25, 2011 at 5:16 pm

    Ok Heraldo you name 3 cartoons from as you stated yourself last year up until now,3. Its a weekly rag so out of 104 NCJ’s 101 of them were the usual Joel making fun of local people and 3,aimed at what I view behind meth/heroin as the biggest problem in Eureka.

  90. Anonymous
    September 25, 2011 at 5:24 pm

    Joel would design a cartoon featuring smoke monster if only smokey was recognizable and relevant.

  91. Anonymous
    September 25, 2011 at 6:42 pm

    Well 524, since Joel did just that, I suppose SM is “recognizable and relevant”.

  92. Hum Depot
    September 25, 2011 at 10:02 pm

    Police training changed after the forming of the Department of Homeland Security. Less detective and more Swat Team.

    No one would recognize Colombo anymore. He didn’t take steroids.

  93. Anonymous
    September 26, 2011 at 6:17 am

    Did the jury put any of the blame on Cotton? For his part, you know under the influence of drugs and starting fights at the homeless shelter in the first place.

  94. September 26, 2011 at 7:09 am

    There is no proof that Martin Cotton was under the influence of any drug when he was beaten to death. The initial tox screen came back clean. There is no proof that he started any fights at the Rescue Mission. He was involved in an altercation but we don’t know who started it. We do know that the only person injured in the mission fight apparently injured himself.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  95. September 26, 2011 at 7:29 am

    OK folks, this judgment is not about the beating, as brutal as it was, this is about NOT taking this person to the hospital to be treated. The court found that Martins death was a result of NOT being taken to see a medical professional.

    “THE JURY found that EPD officers Adam Laird and Justin Winkle used excessive force against Cotton, while officer Gary Whitmer did not. The jury found that Laird, Whitmer, and Winkle were “deliberately indifferent” to Cotton’s serious medical needs when they failed to get him medical treatment before booking him into the jail.

    “THE JURY ALSO found that the City failed to adequately train its police officers in obtaining medical care for arrestees who have had force used against them and that the officers involved acted “maliciously, oppressively, or in reckless disregard” of Cotton’s constitutional rights. In the wake of the incident, (EPD Chief) Nielsen changed EPD policy to require any suspect involved in an altercation—with police or others—be treated and evaluated by a medical professional before being booked….

    This is not about the LSD ( although there should be an investigation into the cover up of the beating death by EPD and the coroner.), nor is it about the beating, anyone that resists the police will in fact get physically restrained, it is about the depraved indifference the officers showed this gentleman, most likely because he was a “bum.’

  96. tra
    September 26, 2011 at 7:55 am

    Well it’s at least partly about the beating, hence the finding of “excessive force.”

  97. ///////-Black---Flag\\\\\\
    September 26, 2011 at 10:05 am

    This is what happens when armed tax collectors wear masks and black uniforms and wage war on unarmed people along with private property owners.
    what I find amusing is you filthy neo hippies would be cheering if EPD stormed Security National and killed instead of capturing anyone in the building. Your values are misguided and slanted, the same way the occupation force has slanted values that are openly Un-American.
    After the next great crisis which will leave many of you broken and homeless you’ll want to take up arms under a black uniform to feed yourselves, plus you’ll enjoy the power and control of drawing down on unarmed/under trained citizens.
    You’ll assume the values of what you all claim to hate and embrace the darkness. This has been shown time and time again throughout history…..
    Government can only steal from and kill it’s citizens once it goes bankrupt, and the hungry will cheer at the demise of those with more than they have.
    Neo hippies and communists with their misguided values will be easily moved to harm their fellow countrymen for a few credits on a fedscript plastic card, just like the garbage hippies from the 60’s did.

  98. Anon
    September 26, 2011 at 10:58 am

    Where did the court find ” excessive force”?

  99. Plain Jane
    September 26, 2011 at 11:28 am

    Here you go Anon:

    Laird & Winkle – unreasonable / excessive force? Yes
    Whitmer – unreasonable / excessive force? No

    Did unreasonable / excessive cause injury? Yes

    Read the rest at PDF on Highboldtage:

    http://highboldtage.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/verdict_cottoncase.pdf

  100. skippy
    September 26, 2011 at 1:41 pm

    Good point, Mark and Tra.
    Nice link, PJ and HB Bill.

    …have a peaceful day…

  101. Anonymous
    September 26, 2011 at 2:44 pm

    He had just spent a almost a month in jail? Full of LSD while causing a disturbance in front of the homeless buffet…looks like we lost a real asset to our community. Its too bad that he was combative to the point where the officers had to use excessive force. It sounds shitty, but the daughter is better off without him.

  102. September 26, 2011 at 4:03 pm

    According to the testimony of the officers at trial, Cotton was not combative. He was not in front of the “homeless buffet.” It is only conjecture, a story. that he was “full of LSD.”

    Either you are seriously misinformed or you are intentionally spreading lies.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  103. William Verick
    September 26, 2011 at 5:06 pm

    As for the comments of good old BF (Nobody ever turned their back on him!):. As a Humboldt County liberal, I would not be happy if armed tax collectors (or code compliance officers in black helicopters) stormed Security National and imposed excessive force, blunt force injuries and all. I would prefer it if their approach was therapeutic. Top management of Security National should be given copious enemas. That would, perhaps, relax their tightly clenched sphincter muscles and void any potentially toxic residue they may have retained while walking around (or sitting at) the Balloon Track.

  104. September 26, 2011 at 5:22 pm

    Hey, you’re talkin’ ’bout a Job Creator!

  105. Anonymous
    September 26, 2011 at 6:20 pm

    Wow…90% of you guys are total nut jobs, it’s no wonder the world is going to hell in a handbasket. Craziness is here… on this site, for sure. I have never even heard of this site and now I know why. You think the balloon track is toxic, this site is what is lethal. Wow, is all I can say and I’ll never waste time checking this site out every again. You all need help…..

  106. Goldie
    September 26, 2011 at 6:39 pm

    The article in the Times-Standard says the County settled for $100,000 before going to trial. Who decided for the city of Eureka to not settle out of court? I would say that decision cost the city a few million.
    I also wonder if the procedures implemented by Chief Nielsen after Mr. Cotton’s death that required suspects involved in any altercation to be medically evaluated are still in effect or have they been altered by the current acting chief of police?

  107. September 26, 2011 at 8:25 pm

    Notice how the extremist Una-Posters are trying to tag “Liberals, Progressives and Rational-Moderates; as “Neo-Libs” and “Neo-Hippies” So weak.
    I think Mr. Pesticide is on the wrong blog. He’s much better known over at Craigslist’s RnR.
    Seriously though, some of these guys are so virulent and nasty; showing a seething hate and rage that’s really scary.
    The right wingers/tea-party people are crazy, violent, ignorant ragers that are ready to explode at whoever dares stand up for workers, families or the poor. Bunch of “killers-on-the-hoof” armed and dangerous. Won’t be long before their ranting attacks on liberal blogs won’t be enough. Hitler had his thugs and whether the reasonable “Conservatives” like it or not; these are their thugs.
    Who do the liberals have? Michael Moore? Noam Chomsky? They wouldn’t last long in the ring with these savage Neo-Cons.

  108. Granpa McCoy
    September 26, 2011 at 8:44 pm

    I reckon that there Mr. Bragg is a much sharper tack than that Miz Delaney……I reckon about 45 times sharper…..

  109. mresquan
    September 27, 2011 at 7:16 am

    For some reason the T-S. isn’t letting me copy and paste,but new chief Murl sure made some nutty comments in today’s paper.

  110. Anonymous
    September 27, 2011 at 7:37 am

    Tyson, Jager, Harpham. A pack of liars.

  111. September 27, 2011 at 8:06 am

    Excerpt from today’s T-S:

    While Sarmiento said she hopes the verdict has a deterrent effect, EPD Interim Police Chief Murl Harpham said Monday that he hopes it does not. Harpham said he was issuing a memo to all department employees telling them: “Don’t pay attention to those anonymous blogs written by cop haters and don’t let the decision influence the way you do your duties because that can get you hurt or your partner hurt, or killed. … You can’t be out there worrying about being sued.”

    The officers were involved in a “knock-down, drag out,” Harpham said, adding that their shirts were torn and their name plates were ripped off during the altercation.

    ”I think they were wronged,” Harpham said of the officers, adding that they are “kind” men, noting that Winkle was named “Officer of the Year” in 2007 and Laird was promoted to sergeant earlier this year. “They’re just good people, and they wouldn’t do what’s been claimed here out of viciousness or anything like that.”

    Harpham said he believes the verdict was part of an Oakland-area backlash to officers facing excessive force allegations on the heels of a number of incidents, including the case of Oscar Grant, who was shot and killed by a Bay Area Rapid Transit officer in 2009.

    ”Juries are unpredictable,” Harpham said. “All you have to do is look at what’s been happening, like the Casey Anthony jury.”

    While Harpham maintained that Cotton was “very violent,” Sarmiento said evidence presented at trial showed that Cotton did not physically assault officers but was simply resisting by not giving up his hands to be cuffed. Sarmiento said no evidence was presented to indicate that Cotton was behaving in a wildly violent manner, either before or after officers arrived on scene.

    ”There was a characterization of Mr. Cotton as a violent person but, in truth, there was no evidence of the type of violent behavior that would have justified this extent of force,” she said. “There’s evidence of some sort of fight (prior to the officers’ arrival), but to characterize him as violently attacking people is not consistent with the evidence that I’ve seen or was presented at trial.”

    In the wake of Cotton’s death, then Humboldt County Coroner Frank Jager and District Attorney Paul Gallegos both said jail surveillance video footage of Cotton thrashing in his holding cell made it impossible to discern whether his fatal injuries were self-inflicted while in custody or sustained during prior altercations, including the one with officers.

    Despite numerous requests, Humboldt County has declined to make the video public.

    Sarmiento said the video — which was presented by the city at trial — does not present any evidence that Cotton’s injury was self-inflicted.

  112. Plain Jane
    September 27, 2011 at 8:07 am

    These bizarre comments, Mresquan?”

    While Sarmiento said she hopes the verdict has a deterrent effect, EPD Interim Police Chief Murl Harpham said Monday that he hopes it does not. Harpham said he was issuing a memo to all department employees telling them: “Don’t pay attention to those anonymous blogs written by cop haters and don’t let the decision influence the way you do your duties because that can get you hurt or your partner hurt, or killed. … You can’t be out there worrying about being sued.”

    ”I think they were wronged,” Harpham said of the officers, adding that they are “kind” men, noting that Winkle was named “Officer of the Year” in 2007 and Laird was promoted to sergeant earlier this year. “They’re just good people, and they wouldn’t do what’s been claimed here out of viciousness or anything like that.”

    When you have a police chief who thinks “kind men” are capable of beating an unarmed man to death in broad daylight in front of witnesses, who sends a memo out to ignore critics and multi-million dollar verdicts, publicly contradicts the testimony of every trial witness, including his own men who were there, you should harden your conscience because its going to be shocked again.

  113. September 27, 2011 at 8:20 am

    Jane has it exactly right! But then, what do you expect when the city votes in conservative Republicans that think Harpham’s “Tough Cops” are the people’s solution? This city gets exactly what it wants – class war.

  114. Plain Jane
    September 27, 2011 at 8:24 am

    You should have included the rest of Sarmiento’s last statement, Heraldo.

    ”What you see in that video is that he’s writhing in pain and holding his head,” Sarmiento said. “You see a man in his last hours of life in excruciating pain.”

  115. September 27, 2011 at 8:34 am

    It is time for D.A. Gallegos to revisit the question of criminal charges. If they can do it in Fullerton, Orange County, CA we sure as hell can do it here.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  116. skippy
    September 27, 2011 at 8:44 am

    Additional excerpts from today’s Times-Standard article Thadeus Greenson, “Attorney: Cotton Verdict Sends Message”

    Eureka City Manager David Tyson said Monday that he couldn’t say much about the incident because he is still working to get information about the verdict from local attorney Nancy Delaney, who represented the city in the matter, and has not yet briefed the city council on the subject. Both Tyson and the city’s insurance carrier said the city has already spent the entire amount of its coverage deductible on the case, so the city’s general fund will not be impacted by the award. Tyson said he was surprised by Friday’s verdict because it “is counter” to the findings of independent inquiries conducted after Cotton’s death.

    Tyson also said that the council will not have a say in whether to appeal the verdict, as that decision rests in the hands of the city’s insurance carriers, including the Redwood Empire Municipal Insurance Fund, or REMIF. REMIF General Manager Mark Ferguson said that because the award in the Cotton case exceeds his fund’s level of exposure, a number of excess insurance carriers will ultimately decide whether to appeal.

    The purpose of insurance is spreading the risk, or spreading the liability, around,” Ferguson said, adding that’s why REMIF has excess carriers. “At this point, this is past our level of exposure, so we’re dealing with the excess people. They’re the ones that make decisions at this point.

    The council will decide whether it wants to pay for the punitive damages awarded against its individual officers. “That’s a council decision, and the council will be briefed on it,” Tyson said, adding that he hopes that briefing will occur in the coming days.”
    (Thadeus Greenson, Times-Standard, September 27, 2011)

  117. Me
    September 27, 2011 at 10:31 am

    My sadness over this incident stems from the fact that Martin got out of jail that day and no one, not his dad, mom, or friend, no one was there to pick him up and take him to a safe place for a hot, home made meal, comfort and advise on getting his life in order. Sadness for the years Martin spent without the support and guidance of a loving family who obviously failed him long before that terrible day at the Rescue Mission.

  118. Anonymous
    September 27, 2011 at 10:41 am

    Maybe you could also be a little sad that you live in a town where someone can be beaten to death with impunity.

  119. Me
    September 27, 2011 at 12:02 pm

    My sadness is that we live in a society where people abandon their children, where our politicians close mental health facilities to treat these abandoned people, and where we have a police department at all. Why do we have police? What do police do? They are called to situations that are by definition out of control. They are, by law, required to take control. When someone doesn’t cooperate, force is used. From what I have read, these police followed the rule book for police conduct. What were they supposed to do in that situation? If we don’t want police to use force, then we should work to establish a society that doesn’t require a police department.

  120. Anonymous
    September 27, 2011 at 12:22 pm

    After a sound beating, the jury expected them to take their victim to a hospital. Most here concur.

  121. Plain Jane
    September 27, 2011 at 12:44 pm

    I would hope most concur that police brutality, which this undoubtedly was, is incompatible with liberty. Police are not the judge, jury and executioner, even if it’s just a nobody homeless person. According to testimony, Mr. Cotton wasn’t trying to escape, wasn’t fighting the police, wasn’t posing a threat of any kind when laying on his hands, passively resisting. The cops’ own testimony, as well as that of witnesses, gave no justification for a beating. No testimony about “super human strength due to LSD. I’ve heard stories about beatings like this for decades, but they never have witnesses who will testify so it’s their word against multiple cops.

  122. insider
    September 27, 2011 at 1:06 pm

    (Jane sez: You should have included the rest of Sarmiento’s last statement, Heraldo.”What you see in that video is that he’s writhing in pain and holding his head,” Sarmiento said. “You see a man in his last hours of life in excruciating pain.) That’s her spin on it. What it actually shows his a man unattended by guards, beating his head repeatedly against the bench, then he slowly dies.

  123. Plain Jane
    September 27, 2011 at 1:13 pm

    Since they won’t release it, we’ll have to take the word of those who did, Insider. Of course, you’ve never experienced a subdural hematoma that fills your closed skull with blood with increasing pressure on the brain, causing the most excruciating pain imaginable so you don’t know what someone might look like who is experiencing it along with seizures, right?

  124. September 27, 2011 at 1:57 pm

    A memo o all department s reads:Don’t pay attention to those anonymous blogs wtitten by cop haters… scary!!!!!That is
    Muri Harpham!!!!

  125. tra
    September 27, 2011 at 5:12 pm

    Harpham has doen a real disservice to his fellow polie officers, and to the publi at large, by telling police officers to ignore the jury’s findings that excessive force was used.

    When something similar happens in the future, will Murl offer to pay the full amount of any judgement against any individual officers who follow his advice and choose to behave the same way as the officers did in this case? The judgements against Laird and Winkle came to $45,000 in this lawsuit, but it could be even more next time.

    And will Murl be willing to cover the city’s dedutible, as well as any increase in the city’s insurance rates that results from these big payouts?

    In other words, will Murl put his money where his mouth is? I’m betting the answer is “no.”

  126. tra
    September 27, 2011 at 5:24 pm

    Aside from the money angle, it seems to me that Murl is risking his officers’ safety, too: If suspects believe that if the cops get their hands on them, they’re going to be beaten within an inch of their life (or beyond), the risk is that some of these suspects may take desperate measures to try to escape.

    In other cases, the risk is not to the officers, but to justice and public safety in general: If folks are concerned that calling the police may result in unnecessary excessive-force-caused injuries and deaths, people may be hesitant to call the police in the first place, meaning that more perpetrators may escape justice, and some may go on to commit further crimes.

    So Murl’s knee-jerk defensive reaction is ounterproductive in all sorts of ways.

    Time for a new Chief of Police — one who is NOT part of the “Old Guard” clique that has cost this community so much in blood and treasure.

  127. Anonymous
    September 27, 2011 at 6:07 pm

    Tra,
    We had that police chief in Garr Nielsen. Clearly that is not what Tyson or the council want. They wish to perpetuate the “good ole boy” mentality regardless of the price in money or treasure.

  128. insider
    September 27, 2011 at 6:12 pm

    (Jane sez: Since they won’t release it, we’ll have to take the word of those who did, Insider. Of course, you’ve never experienced a subdural hematoma that fills your closed skull with blood with increasing pressure on the brain, causing the most excruciating pain imaginable so you don’t know what someone might look like who is experiencing it along with seizures, right?)
    My point was the county got off with paying a $100,000 settlement, when they should have examined their prisoner when then checked him in. They said he was too combative! the jailers did nothing while he beat his head on a bench for a couple of hours.
    The county was represented by bill brag, eureka was stuck with blow hard incompetent delaney.

  129. Doubter
    September 27, 2011 at 6:17 pm

    Shannon Flowers should sue these bastards too, for trampling on her Constitutional rights. She could get 100k easy.

  130. tra
    September 27, 2011 at 7:32 pm

    It seems like Delaney is making a career of unsuccessfully defending the city in these excessive-force lawsuits. Though a settlement might have saved millions, a trial generates a lot more billable hours for the attorney. So the attorney’s financial incentive is for the city to fight these lawsuits all the way to the end, no matter what the result, rather than settling, as the County did.

    A rational City Council would act as a counterweight to an attorney’s avarice, because the attorneys would risk losing the city as a client if they repeatedly gave bad advice to go to trial rather than settle. But since the City Manager and City Counil have stuck with Delaney despite her high-profile failures, she’s got nothing to lose finanially by continuing to play her game of “we’re very confident we’ll win at trial” while she laughs the way to the bank.

    Meanwhile, Harpham encourages his officers to ignore the findings of the jury and go ahead and behave the same way in the future…more or less guaranteeing another needless death and another big-money lawsuit in the not-so-distant future. As in so many other situations involving dysfunctional government agencies, “nobody wins…except the lawyers.”

  131. Anonymous
    September 27, 2011 at 7:59 pm

    Insider, methinks you doth protest too much; could it be you’re on the hook personally?

    6:07, One of the officers found liable was one of Garr’s fair haired boys, so you can put that in your pipe and smoke that one. This occurred on Garr’s watch, no way around that one.

  132. William Verick
    September 28, 2011 at 4:24 am

    Since this was all covered by the City’s insurance, the City isn’t going to feel any immediate direct fiscal impact. Still, the EPD’s murderous record combined with Harpham’s in-your-face celebration on behavior that leads to $5 million judgments, is likely to lead to significant increases in the premiums the City is going to have to pay to insure those who should be un-insurable.

    What sane insurance company would renew a policy to insure a department headed by Murl Harpham?

    A fruitful avenue of inquiry should be a continuing series of Public Records Act requests for communications between the City and its insurer. How much are the City’s rates going to go up? Why? When this information becomes available it should be reported to the high heavens.

    This is what it will take to get the full fiscal and political measure of the direction Tyson plans to take the City in the post-Larry Glass era.

  133. September 28, 2011 at 7:42 am

    The insurer is a consortium of other No CA municipalities, Bill. They are all in it together, which may explain their DADT policy regarding pretty much everything.

    REMIF: Redwood Empire Municipal Insurance Fund.

  134. Anonymous
    September 28, 2011 at 8:06 am

    consider me re miffed.

  135. anon
    September 28, 2011 at 8:09 am

    Harpham is almost 80 years old and should have retired at least 10 or more years ago. Did anyone really think anything would come out of his mouth that didn’t show his ignorance and his good ol boy 60’s-70’s era cop mentality? He was one of the main detractors of Nielsen, hasn’t wasted time changing a buncha Nielsen stuff, and will continue to show his ignorance and stupidity as long as he is there. Big surprise.

  136. yeah right
    September 28, 2011 at 8:10 am

    Yea go ahead and appeal it. Delaney can make double what she has so far.

    If you keep voting for the corrupt you can keep kissing your tax dollars goodbye.

  137. Die-Hard Liberal
    September 28, 2011 at 1:58 pm

    Have any of you ever worked as a police officer or have you ever gone on a ride along with a police officer? I highly recommend it. You might have very different opinions after one night walking in their shoes.

  138. September 28, 2011 at 3:48 pm

    The fact of the matter is that this is one of the largest Excessive Force verdicts in recent history in CA. I am especially unnerved that Ms. Delaney’s opening statement on what the evidence that the officers would testify to was actually contradicted by their testimony. All of the officer’s testimony had already been given in depositions. That testimony was probably pretty close to what they would have testified to at trial. In fact all of the officers should have given their transcripts to review prior to their testimony. Unfortunately grounds for appeal are not that the attorney screwed up. Might support a Legal Malpractice claim. The comments about the insurance are right on. If the department doesn’t re-look at everything connected with this case, it would violate the fiduciary duty of those insurers to give them insurance if Murl Harpham continues to be in charge and will not institute a re-look at all policies then the city will be on the hook and have to really self-insure. I think Harpham is proving all those who were opposed to Nielsen’s firing right.

  139. HumCoLocal
    September 28, 2011 at 5:23 pm

    Die Hard, anyone on a ride along that day would have had their cell phone camera smashed and they would have been threatened not to talk. You are right it is a tough job.

  140. Anonymous
    September 28, 2011 at 10:58 pm

    It may be the largest award in recent CA history, and it would be painful to have to “re-look” at police policies after Harpham’s stupid bravado, but, you know the old saying….better to be in Hell with your friends than in heaven being held accountable…

  141. High Finance
    September 30, 2011 at 11:54 am

    It won’t be the first verdict that is reversed on appeal.

  142. Octago
    September 30, 2011 at 12:00 pm

    Hi Finance stick to your Laffer Curves and other right wing economic masturbations besides you should be busy right now creating jobs! We need you jjob creators to keep your promises now more than ever!

    But it is clear that you know not much about the legal system. Let’s hope you decide to defend yourself when you are arrested someday.

  143. Plain Jane
    September 30, 2011 at 12:07 pm

    Do you really think it should be, HiFi? On what grounds?

  144. Fact Checker
    September 30, 2011 at 12:50 pm

    Captain Obvious said: “It won’t be the first verdict that is reversed on appeal.”

    Some are reversed, some are not. Justice is what you have after the last appeal has been either heard or denied. You should have paid attention in 5th grade Hi Liar, you’d know this.

    “Although the Supreme Court has never explicitly overruled the Dred Scott case, the Court stated in the Slaughter-House Cases that at least one part of it had already been overruled by the Fourteenth Amendment in 1868:[4]”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dred_Scott_v._Sandford

  145. skippy
    September 30, 2011 at 12:57 pm

    I don’t always subscribe to Verbena’s point of view, but she called the case accurately from the get-go. She was at the trial, has her own activist bias, and this was her letter to the NCJ yesterday:

    MARTIN Cotton was attacked by EIGHT EPD officers. The three who were on trial were the ones who were there the longest beating on him, and hid the fatal injuries they inflicted by throwing him in the jail, not the hospital.

    CIVILIAN witnesses are not the only ones who say the cops pepper sprayed, batoned, kicked, kneed, and kneed Martin almost entirely while Martin was prone on the cement- THE COPS ADMIT THAT!

    THE FILM from the jail was shown in the trial. You guys are still buying into that “banged his own head to death” story? Disgusting. The man was in pain and dying. Winkle (who admitted over and over again that he was pushing Martin’s head onto the cement while the other cops were beating the life out of Martin) bashed his head in so bad onto the concrete, that there was bleeding on three parts of his brain…If more people (and reporters) are so dumbfounded and unclear as to what happened, they might have wanted to go to Oakland… and listened to the officers and civilian witnesses testify.

    AND just to show how psychotic EPD culture is… Murl Harpham was saying he hopes the lawsuit is not a deterrent to excessive force! … That these particular cops were promoted (soon after they beat a man to death), and were wronged with regards to Martin Cotton…. that the cops should not be worried about lawsuits….Crooked, Violent, Insane, AND Stupid.

    …REMEMBER Humboldt’s torture history with pepper spray? Nancy Delaney, the same lawyer trying to cover up the truth in this murder of Martin Cotton, put her kids through college getting paid to defend THAT pepper spray torture.”

    The verdict will undoubtedly be appealed. We’ll see if Siehna M. Cotton vs. City of Eureka is overturned… or not.

  146. Plain Jane
    September 30, 2011 at 1:04 pm

    So what does the City of Eureka do about having police officers who beat a man to death and an acting police chief who condones it?

  147. WhatNow
    September 30, 2011 at 1:26 pm

    GREAT post, Skippy.

  148. Goldie
    September 30, 2011 at 2:19 pm

    Great question, Jane.

  149. High Finance
    October 1, 2011 at 8:04 pm

    But PJ, your hero Garr Nielsen was the chief at the time and he publicly supported his officers then !

    And I’m sorry for those who have never put their lives on the line but sit back on their easy chairs and criticise those who do.

    If there is a addict, high on LSD who has started several fights already what do you want the cops to do ? I for one do not one solo cop to take him on and get seriously injured. You armchair nobodys think some movie star cop will take him out ?

    The addict started the fight with the cops. He fought all the way to the drunk tank. If he had submitted he would be alive (and probably high again) today.

    You people have no idea of what the real world is like. Thank God we have people willing to serve as cops and put their necks on the line. Shame on you for not supporting them.

  150. Apologist Not
    October 2, 2011 at 11:35 am

    It’s corrupt and sadistic to support bad-cops, they harm everyone, including the good cops.

    They got Cotton into the jail, they could have gotten him to the hospital.

    Do you REALLY think that juries, judges, and supportive citizens that demand police accountability are “cop-haters”?

    Do you REALLY think citizens are “no-growthers” because they don’t want more big boxes in a community already saturated in poverty-wages?

    Did I get that right Murl?

    Chain of Fools…..

  151. October 2, 2011 at 11:47 am

    High Finance you are simply lying about Cotton. He did not struggle or start a fight with the cops. The cops testified to this at the trial. That is why the city lost the lawsuit you dumb ass. Martin Cotton was not a drug addict and he may or may not have been high on lsd. You are slandering a dead person.

    You are the one who has no idea of what the real world is like.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  152. High Finance
    October 3, 2011 at 7:50 am

    Bill, Bill, Bill. Have some more medicinal marijuana and calm down. Try reading the Times Standard articles on all the fighting he did that day.

  153. Police are people too!
    October 3, 2011 at 3:30 pm

    When does Martin Cotton Jr. and his family’s behavior come in to play? This incident didn’t just spring full-blown. Regarding Martin Cotton Jr. – there was a lifetime of dubious history while on the road to self-destruction. The three police officers were following their own paths. . .education, marrying and fathering children, following society’s rules, being employed and trying to maintain a safe environment for all of us. Which is the road best traveled?

  154. Die-hard liberal
    October 3, 2011 at 3:34 pm

    If you want the cops to view the homeless as people, then you need to view the cops as human. Hate, in any form, is counter productive.

  155. Die-hard liberal
    October 3, 2011 at 3:51 pm

    Highboldtage, although I respect your opinion and voice, how can you possibly say that Mr. Cotton did not struggle. Do you really think that a police officer WANTS to fight with some who they do not know and who may very well have hepatitis, tuberculosis, HIV…and any number of diseases that can be easily transmitted in hand to hand combat. The LAST thing MOST cops want to do is fight someone. They are humans who want to come home safe to their families every night. I wasn’t there but after reading what I have read, it is obvious that there was something terribly wrong with Mr. Cotton that sad, sad day. And that is why the police were called to the scene. I’m sure that each of those cops would rather have been somewhere else that day.

  156. October 3, 2011 at 4:04 pm

    According to the testimony at the trial, the cops themselves testified that Martin Cotton was not resisting them and not trying to flee.

    So I agree with you that the behavior of the cops that day is inexplicable.

    Nowhere have I said that I hate cops and nowhere have I dehumanized them. I walk the streets and talk the talk and the street cops or most of them anyway know the truth about me: I am not a hater.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  157. Police are people too!
    October 3, 2011 at 4:25 pm

    Regarding the Cotton, Jr. trial and the testimonies of the police officers – questions by the Cotton family lawyer were couched like the old one “have you stopped cheating on your wife?”

    For all of those who blame the police. . .maybe some day you will be in a situation where you are fighting with someone, have to resort to violence and then go on trial and found guilty of harm. Hopefully, there will be people who understand the circumstances, believe in you and support you.

  158. insider
    October 3, 2011 at 4:25 pm

    Your just wrong Bill, he was constantly resisting from the moment they got there.

  159. October 3, 2011 at 4:36 pm

    It’s too bad there isn’t any video of the incident. That might reconcile the stories.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  160. October 3, 2011 at 4:41 pm

    These three officers can hold a press conference and tell the world what happened that day. They can tell their story. The lawsuit is over and they need not fear the repercussions of their testimony.

    That would be a start.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  161. tra
    October 3, 2011 at 5:07 pm

    Police are people too! said: “The three officers were…following society’s rules.”

    According to the jury, which heard all the evidence, including testimony from the officers themselves, the police did NOT “follow society’s rules” that day. Not even close. Hence the finding of “excessive force” against several of the officers, and the $4.5 million dollar judgement.

  162. anonymous
    October 3, 2011 at 5:28 pm

    “Highboldtage, although I respect your opinion and voice, how can you possibly say that Mr. Cotton did not struggle. Do you really think that a police officer WANTS to fight with some who they do not know and who may very well have hepatitis, tuberculosis, HIV…and any number of diseases that can be easily transmitted in hand to hand combat. The LAST thing MOST cops want to do is fight someone.”

    Most cops, absolutely. The overwhelming majority of all people. But why do you find it so hard to believe there is a recurring human personality type “violent ass-kicker” that, 1/1,000th of the population they may be, exist within police departments as well as anywhere else in the world? To become a police officer, you already have to at least successfully pretend you’re fully willing to commit lethal acts of violence against other human beings at the drop of a hat. If necessary, of course. Like minds gravitate, even within police departments.

    The whole thing reads really simple. The rough gang o’ cops that deal with the rough crowd in old town roughed up a guy too much and he died because of it. They fucked up bigtime, they killed a guy. Think of how many times they’ve never been given attention for beating people. Think of how many of those people might have been very close to dying because of it. No evidence of that, right? This case is the first time those police officers have ever royally kicked the shit out of a guy who was flipping out on drugs in old town, I’m sure. That’s not how to deal with any problem, they tell us.

  163. Police are people too!
    October 3, 2011 at 5:45 pm

    To tra: I wrote that the three policemen were following society’s rules by being employed, paying taxes, taking care of their children, etc., etc. Because the civil trial was held in Oakland (after the trial of the Metro incident) there was no manner that the officers would ever get a fair trial by an Oakland jury. In my opinion, the jury did not want to be accused of being partial to a police force. When the verdict was made by the jurors, three of the them were dressed in black to show solidarity with the pro-Cotton protestors who were picketing daily outside the courtroom. How did seeing the protestors influence their verdict? Also, the presence of Cotton Jr.’s daughter in the courtroom seems highly questionable to me. Writing about Cotton, Jr.’s daughter, where is her mother? Why is an aunt raising her? I hope the settlement the daughter receives will put her on a path unlike her father’s!

  164. October 3, 2011 at 6:04 pm

    Really? The best argument that you can make is to smear a little girl and her family?

    Police are people too, I agree.

    They need to be subject to the same laws and restraint of behavior that is expected of all the rest of us.

    I don’t think that these officers are evil men. I think this was a case of a police force that was (and still is) severely undertrained, and suffering a culture of harshness towards the homeless that has been fostered from top down (Tyson-Douglas-Harpham) for years.

    Modern police departments require that their officers be trained in some kind of martial art so that they can obtain compliance without the use of weapons. Where was this training on Oct 9? Where is it now?

    Garr Neilsen was making positive changes, but he got punked by the good ole boys when this happened and he bought their bullshit about the video etc. I think Neilsen underestimated the rancid culture of hate against the poor that exists in this city.

    Eureka needs a modern police chief, and probably like Neilsen, another outsider. Only an outsider can clean up this mess.. Living in the past is unhealthy and very very expensive.

    And I am not painting the EPD with a broad brush. There are no doubt plenty of good solid cops on the force. Let’s give them some modern leadership.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  165. Police are people too!
    October 3, 2011 at 6:57 pm

    You are the one who suggests that my writing a factual statement about Cotton Jr.’s daughter is a “smear”. Can you defend the family and lawyers for using her in such a way to gain sympathy? What then was the reason for her to be in the courtroom. Do you think it is not traumatic for such a young person? Did the family and lawyers check with a psychologist first before subjecting her to the trial? Just a thought. To be sure – I wish the child great success!

    What do you have to say about the Oakland jurors?

  166. Plain Jane
    October 3, 2011 at 7:08 pm

    She was a plaintiff, Police. People should feel sympathy for an orphaned baby who isn’t even going to remember her father as she grows up. Don’t you?

  167. October 3, 2011 at 8:32 pm

    One unanswered question is who was in charge of the EPD on Aug 9, 2007? Most police departments have sergeants who are out on patrol with the beat officers, (on each shift) who takes control of tactical situations, and also usually a shift commander (lieutenant, captain or chief) who commands from the headquarters.

    Was there a tactical sergeant working that day? If so who was it? Why didn’t he simply stop the beating, pull his men off after say, five minutes or so. Who was the overall commander that shift? Neilsen himself? Captain Harpham? Who? Why did he whoever it was let this situation get so out of hand?

    Is that supervisor(s) still working for the EPD?

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  168. High Finance
    October 4, 2011 at 11:46 am

    I wish PJ had as much sympathy for the families of the three cops.

    Families that will suffer greatly if these three are punished for doing their jobs. They put their lives on the line confronting a out of control big guy high on LSD. A job that none of you Monday morning quarterbacks would ever do.

  169. Smart 5th Grader
    October 4, 2011 at 12:23 pm

    High Finance says:
    October 4, 2011 at 11:46 am

    “Families that will suffer greatly if these three are punished for doing their jobs.”

    Doing their jobs? Since when is beating a man on drugs to death “doing their job”? The criminals should of thought of the consequences of their violent behavior and the subsequent impact on their families. Don’t worry Hi Liar, like Kalis, they will likely get “200 hours of community service and three years probation”.

  170. Police are people too!
    October 4, 2011 at 2:46 pm

    If any of you knew the officers involved in this incident you would not be saying any of the things you are saying. None of these men are “kick-ass” cops. Each one went into law enforcement because they wanted to help people and society. Yes, there are many criminal police officers who have done terrible things, but it is ironic that three of the kindest, most by-the-book, law abiding, honest police officers out there, should be the ones to pay.

  171. pissed
    October 4, 2011 at 2:47 pm

    [deleted]

  172. Plain Jane
    October 4, 2011 at 2:57 pm

    They beat a man to death, Police.

    2:47 should be deleted.

  173. October 4, 2011 at 3:03 pm

    You’re speaking to one and the same, Jane. It’s the pissed police.

  174. pissed
    October 5, 2011 at 4:26 pm

    lol

  175. October 5, 2011 at 6:53 pm

    “This is a court of law, young man, not a court of justice.”
    Oliver Wendell Holmes

  176. Apologist Not
    October 7, 2011 at 1:02 pm

    That’s why there’s appeals Ollie.

    And the officers, their union, their city, their insurance, and even their incomes can afford one. Unlike the majority of working-poor who suffer the financial prejudices of “justice” in America every day.

    Who wants to take a man to a hospital, (full of potentially hostile witnesses), after you just gave him the beating of his life?

  177. Curious
    October 8, 2011 at 12:51 pm

    Does anyone have any background information about Martin Cotton Jr. (where he was born, his schooling, hobbies, aledged police record, etc.)? I would like to know more about him.

  178. Curious
    October 8, 2011 at 12:55 pm

    Oops! I misspelled alleged!

  179. Curious
    October 10, 2011 at 3:27 pm

    Hello-anyone out there? Does anyone have background information as I had asked previously about the young man (Martin Cotton, Jr.)?

  180. Goldie
    October 10, 2011 at 4:27 pm

    Curious, if you were to google Martin Cotton, North Coast Journal you will find an article that is informative.

  181. zzz
    October 10, 2011 at 4:33 pm

    Japhet was the only local reporter who was curious enough to actually speak to the Cotton family. The Eureka Reporter dug into the story, if only looking to discredit Nielsen. The Tiimid-Standard printed press releases from the coronor, the sheriff and epd.

  182. Sunny Fortuna
    October 12, 2011 at 10:41 am

    Let me get this straight.

    Eureka is self insured along with other local governments in an insurance pool.

    So in effect, this multi-million dollar award will cause the insurance rates to go up, and thus taxpayers in Fortuna, Arcata, Garberville and the rest of Humboldt County will have to eventually pick up the tab for Tyson’s mismanagement and neglect in Eureka?

    Why should people in other cities pay the bill for Eureka’s follies?

  183. john williams
    September 10, 2012 at 2:05 pm

    Ongoing Violations of Human Rights,
    of Levi Mullins Refuses to Build Weapons of Mass Destruction,
    At the same time Levi Mullins designs and patents alternative auto.
    Dukes arrive on research site and confront Levi, attempt to coerce him into giving them control of auto patent.
    Dukes ppear after rape of Jeanne, stating that she is criticizing Nixon and must stop, as they will have something happen to her.
    Levi responds that he has a new hunting rifle and would like to show it to them in his car.

    Political Takedowns,
    Takedown
    Theft of Auto Patent,

    Takedown of Daughter Jeanne Mullins Closing of University Department and Research,
    Used as Hostage/Victim to Assure Levi will Produce Auto Prototype.
    Levi Dies of suspicious Incident 2 Years After completion of Prototype,
    Jeanne Daughter Take Out and Raped by Robert Dukes who Describes himself as Jackal-Describes himself As Being Able to Take Down Countries,
    Dukes Confront Levi, Informs Levi that Daughter is criticizing Nixon and She will not Get Away with It, (i.e. her development of curriculum is civil rights and research based, Dukes approach Father, Levi at Research site for Blackbird, after Jeanne’s Rape, The Dukes threaten Levi stating that Jeanne will not be able to Recoup, if he cooperates J Hand Levi Prewritten letter for his signature handing over the auto patent to the Duke’s brothers (Robert Ashbury Dukes and Francis Bellinger Dukes) Levi was confronted by all four Dukes , Theft, Torture,

    During President Nixon’s administration my Father stopped a huge build up of weapons of mass destruction. Assigned to retrofit the Blackbird SR71 fleet of thirty with nuclear bombs, planes able to fly at speeds of mach three, allowing the planes to circle the earth with a cargo of nuclear bombs, he and the crew united to assure that such planes were unable to deliver these bombs. One of my Father’s favorite phrases was “back to the design board”, where the planes’ flight would be rendered unstable to carry nuclear bombs.

    My Father drove the budget over $12,000,000, creating and flying these design errors safely, preventing the trade or use, intentional or by error, of such weapons.

    Antics performed by the crew included setting a record of speed in flight while flying over President Nixon’s home, flying the plane with empty bomb bays that would jam when opened, Flying the plane with wheel assembly failure activating during landing.

    Plans for such a fleet armed with weapons of unparralled destruction may have included huge arms trades profits, alliances with countries that would never reach publication, and would create an economy of war, with war like takeovers, and failures to attempt or succeed in negotiations for choice and knowledge, the cornerstone of civil rights.

    These men walked towards peace, a win situation for humanity.

    There is a saying – Old Soldiers love peace.

    My father, a veteran of WWII, surviving the Philippines, Bataan, and concentration camp, was one of many men who wished to defeat the dark cloud of Adolf’s rise, the genocide of Jews, and the purging of the German race through a policed single payee health program, carried out by social services trained by Adolph in psychology who would then minister the purging of the German race, making actions policed actions. Thus, knowledge and choice, the civil rights of health, disappeared in Germany, and also, those who would dissent or criticize.

    When the universal spread of this occupancy was perceived as a threat war was at hand.

    It was the intention of my Father to maintain the peace. It is my intention that his story, and my story, be perceived and used in the manner of further pursuit of peace, and for the establishment of stronger civil rights globally, where the unifying factor becomes that of the enforcement of access to knowledge and choice, the cornerstone of the hope of humanity.

    A study of history tells us that Ford armed Adolf, and Roosevelt supported such an economy of war, The firm establishment of civil rights did not occur in time to protect the genocide of the Jews, or to halt the destruction of the obliteration of civil rights in Germany, or to even sway leaders of America to offer refuge to fleeing Jews.

    The political dissident could not exist in Germany, as the health program participating in the policing of such, these were labeled disfunctional.

    Such a knowledge of history, at the time that many young men joined to fight the invasion of Adolfs army, may have swayed the decisions of these men.

    It is obvious that negotiations of peace, in particular negotiations of global peace, prove successful with enforcement of the principals of civil rights, knowledge and choice.

    At the same time that my Father halted the proliferation of these weapons, he invented an alternatively powered and fueled automobile, plus retooled a golf cart to run on recycled vegetable oils from restaurants.

    At that time, ozone readings were allowed on the radio daily.

    My father’s in laws became instrumental in his takedown from the research site he was working at. The Duke’s, his in laws, were never welcomed in our home when I grew up. I was raised by staunch civil rights activists. Both my mother and father instructed us as small children that we might marry whomever we wished, regardless of race.

    My Father, kept in his study a rifle with a night scope, and would comment to his guests of all races, that they were safe in his house. My Father loved peace.

    I never heard a racist expression. We led by example, we were to have both love and the imagination to seek change. These were the consistent instructions I received from my parents.

    We were not to be joiners of the antiquities of institutions, but should develop the mettle, the imagination, to seek change. And always, to lead with love. They spoke of the Audacity of Hope, as Obama does in his book “Dreams of my Father”.

    Standardized curriculums did not meet their standards, but the opportunity to read and research, as interest, talent and need dictated, pleased them. I read and researched, finally excelling by achieving positions I had both talent in and love for.

    Pursuing my loves and interests, I followed a course of self study, which awarded my efforts of study with a four year scholarship to a college of my choice. However, I was given an opportunity to work with research, change and implementation finding employment with one of the first master’s information systems department. My activities included the implementation of new work environment practices and policy, defining managements value as equal to the success it provided in skill applications, employee choice and career. I defined this new management as an upward mobility management, assuring the greatest possible use of exchange of employee knowledge and employee choice.

    New methods enhancing employee success, upward mobility, combined with the most possible employee choice in meeting goals, replaced supervision. The combination of a much kinder work environment, with the individual and team employee’s goal of assurance of successful skill application, resulted in increased volume without the used of production line environments.

    The use of flex time, on the job coordination and cross training, daily procedure for error created a success oriented work environment for all levels of employee, from entry to advanced. A kind work environment that could share knowledge and work together to assure accuracy, with flextime and choice to suit and promote individual talents and interests excelled in producing employee success and error free services.

    Breaks as needed prevented stress, stress related injury, and mental fatigue. Employee [choice allowed completion of goals on a timely basis, and exceeded growth and time lines.

    It was my goal to publish the new management, that was to accompany the onset of the computer, to have knowledge, choice and kindness remove the monkey from our backs.

  184. john williams
    September 10, 2012 at 2:24 pm

    Martins story is not yet complete. Church involvement and witness of such had been brought up but did not make it to the courtroom. The directive to finish off Martin came from a priest, possible the offset of slander by the mafia based church down the street, where Martin must have seen their collection of smut, and they then catagorized him as dangerous, someone to be dealt with, and as in To Kill a Mockingbird, they slandered Martin, and most likely issued some type of directive. while networking the slander. The associate pastor was described as being good at this, and the few associate pastors who attended often talked of death, and that they didn’t require guests, but it does appear they aare not advocating for the guests.
    .

    Political Takedowns,
    Takedown
    Theft of Auto Patent,

    Takedown of Daughter Jeanne Mullins Closing of University Department and Research,
    Used as Hostage/Victim to Assure Levi will Produce Auto Prototype.
    Levi Dies of suspicious Incident 2 Years After completion of Prototype,
    Jeanne Daughter Take Out and Raped by Robert Dukes who Describes himself as Jackal-Describes himself As Being Able to Take Down Countries,
    Dukes Confront Levi, Informs Levi that Daughter is criticizing Nixon and She will not Get Away with It, (i.e. her development of curriculum is civil rights and research based, Dukes approach Father, Levi at Research site for Blackbird, after Jeanne’s Rape, The Dukes threaten Levi stating that Jeanne will not be able to Recoup, if he cooperates J Hand Levi Prewritten letter for his signature handing over the auto patent to the Duke’s brothers (Robert Ashbury Dukes and Francis Bellinger Dukes) Levi was confronted by all four Dukes , Theft, Torture,

    During President Nixon’s administration my Father stopped a huge build up of weapons of mass destruction. Assigned to retrofit the Blackbird SR71 fleet of thirty with nuclear bombs, planes able to fly at speeds of mach three, allowing the planes to circle the earth with a cargo of nuclear bombs, he and the crew united to assure that such planes were unable to deliver these bombs. One of my Father’s favorite phrases was “back to the design board”, where the planes’ flight would be rendered unstable to carry nuclear bombs.

    My Father drove the budget over $12,000,000, creating and flying these design errors safely, preventing the trade or use, intentional or by error, of such weapons.

    Antics performed by the crew included setting a record of speed in flight while flying over President Nixon’s home, flying the plane with empty bomb bays that would jam when opened, Flying the plane with wheel assembly failure activating during landing.

    Plans for such a fleet armed with weapons of unparralled destruction may have included huge arms trades profits, alliances with countries that would never reach publication, and would create an economy of war, with war like takeovers, and failures to attempt or succeed in negotiations for choice and knowledge, the cornerstone of civil rights.

    These men walked towards peace, a win situation for humanity.

    There is a saying – Old Soldiers love peace.

    My father, a veteran of WWII, surviving the Philippines, Bataan, and concentration camp, was one of many men who wished to defeat the dark cloud of Adolf’s rise, the genocide of Jews, and the purging of the German race through a policed single payee health program, carried out by social services trained by Adolph in psychology who would then minister the purging of the German race, making actions policed actions. Thus, knowledge and choice, the civil rights of health, disappeared in Germany, and also, those who would dissent or criticize.

    When the universal spread of this occupancy was perceived as a threat war was at hand.

    It was the intention of my Father to maintain the peace. It is my intention that his story, and my story, be perceived and used in the manner of further pursuit of peace, and for the establishment of stronger civil rights globally, where the unifying factor becomes that of the enforcement of access to knowledge and choice, the cornerstone of the hope of humanity.

    A study of history tells us that Ford armed Adolf, and Roosevelt supported such an economy of war, The firm establishment of civil rights did not occur in time to protect the genocide of the Jews, or to halt the destruction of the obliteration of civil rights in Germany, or to even sway leaders of America to offer refuge to fleeing Jews.

    The political dissident could not exist in Germany, as the health program participating in the policing of such, these were labeled disfunctional.

    Such a knowledge of history, at the time that many young men joined to fight the invasion of Adolfs army, may have swayed the decisions of these men.

    It is obvious that negotiations of peace, in particular negotiations of global peace, prove successful with enforcement of the principals of civil rights, knowledge and choice.

    At the same time that my Father halted the proliferation of these weapons, he invented an alternatively powered and fueled automobile, plus retooled a golf cart to run on recycled vegetable oils from restaurants.

    At that time, ozone readings were allowed on the radio daily.

    My father’s in laws became instrumental in his takedown from the research site he was working at. The Duke’s, his in laws, were never welcomed in our home when I grew up. I was raised by staunch civil rights activists. Both my mother and father instructed us as small children that we might marry whomever we wished, regardless of race.

    My Father, kept in his study a rifle with a night scope, and would comment to his guests of all races, that they were safe in his house. My Father loved peace.

    I never heard a racist expression. We led by example, we were to have both love and the imagination to seek change. These were the consistent instructions I received from my parents.

    We were not to be joiners of the antiquities of institutions, but should develop the mettle, the imagination, to seek change. And always, to lead with love. They spoke of the Audacity of Hope, as Obama does in his book “Dreams of my Father”.

    Standardized curriculums did not meet their standards, but the opportunity to read and research, as interest, talent and need dictated, pleased them. I read and researched, finally excelling by achieving positions I had both talent in and love for.

    Pursuing my loves and interests, I followed a course of self study, which awarded my efforts of study with a four year scholarship to a college of my choice. However, I was given an opportunity to work with research, change and implementation finding emplork environment, with the individual and team employee’s goal of assurance of successful skill application, resulted in increased

  185. john williams
    September 10, 2012 at 2:37 pm

    Police are people too! :
    When does Martin Cotton Jr. and his family’s behavior come in to play? This incident didn’t just spring full-blown. Regarding Martin Cotton Jr. – there was a lifetime of dubious history while on the road to self-destruction. The three police officers were following their own paths. . .education, marrying and fathering children, following society’s rules, being employed and trying to maintain a safe environment for all of us. Which is the road best traveled? Well no one can say as their are murderers, those that kill by slander in every setting of economic security. I loved Martin.

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