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“Fair Wage Cafe” next Saturday

FairWageCafe12_15_12

  1. Anonymous
    December 8, 2012 at 8:04 am

    A real Fair Wage Cafe would have $12 hamburgers, $5 Pepsi, $15 breakfasts and $50 dinners.

    And oh yeah, no customers.

  2. Anonymous
    December 8, 2012 at 8:21 am

    Maybe they could rename the Avalon. Cail it the “Real Fair Wage Cafe.” It has all that stuff you mention plus the $4.00 tater tots. It could be a trend setter.

  3. December 8, 2012 at 8:35 am

    If you or a group you work with wants to set up an info table at the Fair Wage Cafe, give us a call! 707.442.7465

    See you there, December 15th.from the Eureka Fair Wage folks

    Join Us in Solidarity….

    Fair Wage Cafe Dec.15th

    Join us for food, music, poetry and community. (More details below) Help us move the Eureka Fair Wage Act forward. Raise the pay for 1,000 (or more) of our mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, sons and daughters. Volunteers needed for this event. Musicians, poets, cooks, food handlers, clean up. Donations welcome.

  4. December 8, 2012 at 8:36 am

    Also there is a meeting tonight and every Tuesday at 6:15pm at the Labor Temple. We need all kinds of skills and volunteers!

    Do you know about the Fair Wage Graphic contest?

    http://eurekafairwageact.wordpress.com/2012/12/01/announcing-the-fair-wage-graphic-contest/

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 12/04/12

    FREE COMMUNITY EVENT, Saturday, Dec 15:

    FAIR WAGE CAFE

    On Saturday, December 15th, bring family and friends to the first FAIR WAGE CAFE, hosted by the Eureka Fair Wage folks.

    The Fair Wage Cafe will be at the Labor Temple in Eureka from noon to 5pm, a family friendly event with food, music, poetry, and children’s activities. We invite speakers to talk about fair wages and working conditions, and welcome local community groups to set up information tables. The Fair Wage Cafe is envisioned to be an open and casual space where people of all ages and stripes are free to encounter each other, express ideas for community building, relax, learn, and perhaps get involved in helping pass the Eureka Fair Wage act, raise in-home health care wages, and build strength in the working class of Humboldt County.

    FAIR WAGE CAFE a free community event Saturday, December 15th, noon to 5pm at the Labor Temple, 840 E Street in Eureka, where 9th and E intersect

    Call 707.442.7465 for more information or email info@fairwages.org

    See you there, at the FAIR WAGE CAFE, Saturday December 15th!

  5. December 8, 2012 at 8:38 am

    A Dime A Day

    A new report released today (Wednesday, Oct. 24) in observation of national Food Day 2012 says that a proposal pending in U.S. Congress to raise the minimum wage would increase retail food prices for American consumers by at most 10 cents a day, while helping nearly 8 million food workers and 21 million workers in other industries.

    The report from the recently established Food Labor Research Center, based at the University of California, Berkeley’s Center for Labor Research and Education, along with the Food Chain Workers Alliance and the Restaurant Opportunities Centers (ROC United) looks at the proposed “Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2012.” The act would represent the first increase in the non-tipped minimum wage in five years and the first in 21 years for tipped workers, who because they make $30 or more in tips a month, can be paid less than other workers. “Food workers are some of the lowest-paid workers in America, and they face much higher levels of food insecurity than the rest of the U.S. workforce,” said Saru Jayaraman, director of the Food Labor Research Center. “Our report shows that raising the minimum wage would help them put food on the table while barely, if at all, impacting everyone else’s ability to put food on their tables, too.” The report, “A Dime a Day: The Impact of the Miller/Harkin Minimum Wage Proposal on the Price of Food,” is authored by Jayaraman and Chris Benner, an associate professor of community and regional development at UC Davis. Jayaraman also is the co-founder and co-director of ROC-United. The country’s food system is the largest employer of minimum wage workers, who hold positions ranging from agricultural field hands and food processing plant workers to cooks in diners and waiters in high-end restaurants.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-10-food-day-minimum-wage-hike.html#jCp

  6. Anonymous
    December 8, 2012 at 9:33 am

    Like my kids say, ” I am calling Bullshit”!

  7. Despairing
    December 8, 2012 at 9:47 am

    Bullshit is right.

    For an average, successful, non chain restaurant payroll represents 28-30% of sales and profits are around 8%. Raising the minimum wage for California from $8 to $12 per hour would bring the business to closing its door immediately unless it can raise its prices.

    To pay for the increase in wages & all the payroll taxes, workers comp and related the restaurants would have to raise their prices somewhere around 15-20%.

    Going out to eat is a luxury item. Consumers are very price resistant to luxury items in a tough economy and they would respond by eating out less often forcing the restaurants to raise their prices even further. There will be fewer restaurants resulting in fewer jobs.

  8. December 8, 2012 at 10:06 am

    Which restauarant in Eureka will close if they are mandated to pay $12.00 to their employees?

  9. Despairing
    December 8, 2012 at 10:16 am

    eurekaworker :
    Which restauarant in Eureka will close if they are mandated to pay $12.00 to their employees?

    Which? That is a stupid question. After a number of them close the others will have less competition and will be able to survive by raising their prices.

    You profess to care about the workers who earn minimum wage but then are cold hearted about those that will have their wage reduced to zero.

  10. December 8, 2012 at 10:30 am

    You are the one who is “calling bullshit.” Name a restaurant in town that will close if they are mandated to pay $12 an hour. Its not a stupid question. The employees who work there deserve to know.

  11. Anonymous
    December 8, 2012 at 10:43 am

    The Avalon could move to McKinleyville and lower their prices. They could do that because their property taxes will stay cheap for a few more years in McKinleyville thanks to the generosity of the unborn. Bet they will be real popular in McKinleyville.

    Based on the theory of course that savings as well as costs are passed along to the consumer.

  12. Plain Jane
    December 8, 2012 at 12:05 pm

    People wouldn’t drive to McKinleyville to eat at the Avalon. It’s not worth it when there are so many good choices in Eureka and Arcata.

  13. December 8, 2012 at 12:13 pm

    PJ,

    I hear Central Avenue is exceptionally beautiful this time of year. The asphalt glistens festively in the rain.

  14. anonymous
    December 8, 2012 at 12:22 pm

    Central Avenue was nicer when it was just two lanes, no stoplights, and was US 101.

  15. Plain Jane
    December 8, 2012 at 12:33 pm

    Maybe if they relocated to one of the faux brick castles with a view.

  16. Anonymous
    December 8, 2012 at 12:35 pm

    what I call Bullshit on is Bill Holmes going by the moniker “eurekaworker”. Bill moved up here on SSI and is retired and has never worked up here in Eureka.

  17. December 8, 2012 at 12:50 pm

    Jane, thanks for the memory, in which those brick castles were already very faux.

    I also liked the memory of the glistening 101 main street. And can still remember the windbreak cypresses, planted right up the wire fence along the highway to the airport.

    Maybe they are still there.

  18. December 8, 2012 at 1:00 pm

    My involvement in the Eureka Fair Wage Campaign is no secret. We have open public meetings every tuesday since June and I haven’t missed one, so anyone who cares including our johnny on the spot local media would know that. I do maintain the blog (our website fairwages.og ) and post here with our moniker eurekaworker but I am not an official spokesperson for the campaign. You can contact our signed proponents James Decker, Verbena and Don Swall at info@fairwages.org

    It is true that I have never worked in Eureka except as a musician. Before I retired I did work for 30 years in the private sector in Nevada and southern California.

    The Eureka Fair Wage campaign is composed of peoople of diverse backgrounds and political belieifs. Understand that.

    In my background I have worked for years in management and I have also worked lumping trucks in a KMart warehouse for minimum wage. It is my experience working as a minimum wage worker and as a working poor person myself that compels me to work for them now out of sheer moral imperative. They need a raise badly. If my only life experience was as a well paid asshole I might feel differently. But I don’t, and I can’t.

    have a peaceful day,
    Bill

  19. December 8, 2012 at 1:05 pm

    “If my only life experience was as a well paid asshole I might feel differently. But I don’t, and I can’t.”

    Toooooshay.

  20. Anonymous
    December 8, 2012 at 1:43 pm

    thanks for changing back to highboldtage and not misrepresenting yourself as a “eureka worker” Bill. Come to think of it, James Decker has also never worked a day in Eureka either.

    Wow. Perhaps you could get some actual “eurekaworker”s to help represent your…errr their cause.

  21. December 8, 2012 at 1:56 pm

    We have 1,000 of them so far.

    Anyone who wants to sign but hasn’t been able to emal info@fairwages.org or come to the Fair Wage Cafe Dec 15 at the Labor Temple.

  22. jr
    December 8, 2012 at 4:39 pm

    Today’s NY Times reports that Jon Kest his died. He was the organizer for low wage workers in New York and was the Executive Director of New York Communities for Change http://www.nycommunities.org His obituary is at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/08/nyregion/jon-kest-community-advocate-in-new-york-dies-at-57.html

  23. December 8, 2012 at 4:53 pm

    One of the features of the Eureka Fair Wage Act is the collective bargaining clause. If you are a business that falls under the mandate with 25 or more employees, if you unionize and sign a bona fide collective bargaining agreement with your employees, then you are exempt. So if you are really in a situation where paying 12 dollars an hour will threaten your existence, you can open up your books with your employees and work together to make your business stronger. The collective bargaining clause gives you flexibilty.

    This is called “Workplace Democracy” and it is a wonderful invention.

  24. Anonymous
    December 8, 2012 at 6:48 pm

    Plain Jane :
    People wouldn’t drive to McKinleyville to eat at the Avalon. It’s not worth it when there are so many good choices in Eureka and Arcata.

    Avalon will fold soon, Chef Ron has moved on.

  25. jr
    December 8, 2012 at 6:58 pm

    There are many other talented chefs for Avalon’s kitchen. But if that happens maybe Manora Thai can return to this location. (And Weatherby’s to 4th and R, Lazio’s to the foot of C, O.H.’s to 6th and Commercial……)

  26. Anonymous
    December 8, 2012 at 8:06 pm

    I’ve found Avalon to be rather underwhelming of late. They jumped on the “tapas” band wagon and the quality has gone down hill. Unfortunately, there are not many good “fine dining” choices left in Eureka (although an increasing number of quality mid-range choices). I find Oberon mediocre and the Carter House is more about show than taste, not to mention the astronomical prices. I am willing to drive north, and Larrupin Cafe is still worth the drive. It’s Humboldt’s best in my opinion.

  27. jr
    December 8, 2012 at 8:35 pm

    Anonymous: How about Folie Douce? But one certainly gets spoiled after trips to Healdsburg, Ashland, and the Mendocino Coast

  28. Anonymous
    December 8, 2012 at 9:21 pm

    eurekaworker :
    One of the features of the Eureka Fair Wage Act is the collective bargaining clause. If you are a business that falls under the mandate with 25 or more employees, if you unionize and sign a bona fide collective bargaining agreement with your employees, then you are exempt. So if you are really in a situation where paying 12 dollars an hour will threaten your existence, you can open up your books with your employees and work together to make your business stronger. The collective bargaining clause gives you flexibilty.
    This is called “Workplace Democracy” and it is a wonderful invention.

    You have been proven to not be an Eureka Worker but another person on the government dole. Why should we believe anything a proven liar says?

  29. December 8, 2012 at 9:55 pm

    I have proven that I am a worker and I live in Eureka. We we are done all the workers in Eureka will understand who is working for them and who is fucking them over.

    Why should anyone believe what an anonymous coward like you says?

    If you want to debate use your name otherwise go find yourself.

    Sincerely,
    Bill Holmes

    a supporter of the Eureka Fair Wage Act.

  30. December 8, 2012 at 10:18 pm

    Let me give a little aside to my liberal friends.

    There is nothing, I mean nothing, that pisses off a certain kind of Republican more than raising the minimum wage. I mean of course the Republican whackos that would like to eliminate the minimum wage completely.

    The thing is, about half of Republicans (the moderate half) think that raising the minimum wage is a good idea, because 1) it is not welfare and 2) it incentivises the work ethic so for them it is a win win, but this Repubican split just makes the whackos even more frantic.

    Before this thread is over they will tell you that the minimum wage came right out of the pages of Das Kapital.

  31. December 9, 2012 at 7:31 am

    Anonymous @#28,
    “Few are those who see with their own eyes and feel with their own hearts” – Einstein, as Bill does.

  32. December 9, 2012 at 8:05 am

    #28,

    It’s really not necessary to believe Bill, though I do. Here is the wording of the relevant section:

    123.05 WAIVER THROUGH COLLECTIVE BARGAINING.
    All or any portion of the applicable requirements of this Chapter may be waived in a bona fide collective bargaining agreement, provided that such waiver is explicitly set forth in such agreement in clear and unambiguous terms.

    The act is online at fairwages.org for anyone who wants to read the whole thing.

    As for attacks on Bill, they are only to be expected. I’m sure he expects them, having decided to fight for workers’ rights. The thing is, the words of the act speak for themselves.

  33. Erasmus
    December 9, 2012 at 8:10 am

    Germany, Sweden, and Denmark are among the countries without a minimum wage imposed by legislation on every worker without regard to the nature of the work being done. Instead, collective bargaining in each industry determines what the bottom rung of pay will be. This approach seems to me to be the most equitable to all parties concerned, and it also runs counter both to current Republican ideology and the cookie-cutter methods favored by most Democrats.

  34. Just Watchin
    December 9, 2012 at 8:13 am

    I don’t know about Eureka, but when I was growing up, high school kids depended on jobs that fit their schedules, allowed time for study, yet allowed them to work 10 to 15 hours a week after school. If someone working just two hours a week counts against the 25 employee cap, I could see a lot of those kids getting bumped in favor of full time employees that allow the employer to get below the 25 employee max.

  35. December 9, 2012 at 8:36 am

    From time to time I had such jobs, JW. They were ALWAYS off the books, with the owner pulling a $5 or a $10 out of their wallet and thanking me.

  36. Ponder Z
    December 9, 2012 at 8:52 am

    Let me give a little aside to my conservative friends.

    There is nothing, I mean nothing, that pisses off a certain kind of libtard more than holding the minimum wage. I mean of course the liberal whackos that would like to mandate the yearly progressives minimum wage.

    The thing is, about half of the libtards (the moderate half) think that raising the minimum wage every year is a good idea, because 1) it is welfare and 2) it eliminates the work ethic and guaranties income, so for them it is a win win, but this liberal split just makes the whackos even more agressive and demanding.

    The minimum wage came right out of the pages of Das Kapital.

  37. Just Watchin
    December 9, 2012 at 8:54 am

    Mitch :
    From time to time I had such jobs, JW. They were ALWAYS off the books, with the owner pulling a $5 or a $10 out of their wallet and thanking me.

    I was talking about the likes of McDonalds, BurgerKing, KFC, and others. Not the local mom and pop grocery or hardware store.

  38. janelle
    December 9, 2012 at 3:08 pm

    Restaurants are an interesting case, because the wait staff is paid both an hourly wage and a tip based, in theory, on performance. At one point were restaurants, like farm work and youth, exempt from or with a lower minimum wage?

    My daughter is in Australia. The minimum wage is $23.00 an hour. Cost of living is higher, but not 3 times higher. She is paying slightly more for a room in a house as she did in Salem, OR. The room is smaller. She is paying about what my son paid in San Luis Obispo for a similar sized room. She is working less that full time and living independently, thoug frugally.

    It has been said above that 30% of the cost of a meal is wages. The suggested tip has gone up over the years, I remember when it was 10%, I now tip 20% for good service, and I make allowances if I see they are short staffed. I occasionally tip only 15% , even if the service was a bit sub par, because they don’t make enough to live on without it. Of course in restaurants with bus help part of the waitstaff has to share part of the tip, the cost of the meal on which the tip is based is usually higher. If my math is correct, my tip of 15% equals half the payroll cost of that meal.

    What happens when someone gets the person with a bad day who can’t be satisfied and so doesn’t leave a tip, or someone leaves only a small tip because that is all they can afford, or the food is bad? It is the wait staff that looses.

    What difference is it to the customer if the minimum wage goes up and the tip rate goes down? The answer is that service may suffer. Tipping is not part of the Australian restaurant culture and my daughter reports that service isn’t as good. I asked if she avoids some restaurants. She said it depends on the food.

  39. Anonymous
    December 9, 2012 at 3:29 pm

    Restaurants come and restaurants go, it is the business with the highest failure rate of all.

    If a few restaurants close after the minimum wage is raised, of course they will blame it, but they would have closed anyway.

    When businesses fail the culprit is usually poor management.

  40. December 9, 2012 at 3:34 pm

    #40,

    The flip side is that a cooperative could learn about the costs of running a restaurant by trying to run one. It could start small, with a small food cart. If they could do well, paying a uniform $12/hr, charging what was necessary to meet their food costs and payroll, and conforming to the health laws and licensing requirements, that would be a proof that $12/hr does not doom a restaurant.

    This is the sort of thing I would really encourage “activists” to do. I’ve noticed, though, that they rarely try things like that. So I’m always impressed by and grateful for outfits like the North Coast Coop, and other functioning coops. I’d imagine they involve an awful lot of sustained, consistent hard work.

  41. Just Watchin
    December 9, 2012 at 3:59 pm

    Activist act……they don’t do.

  42. Anonymous
    December 9, 2012 at 4:04 pm

    Mitch :
    #40,

    Do you mean #39? Addressed to #40.

  43. Anonymous
    December 9, 2012 at 4:08 pm

    Just Watchin :
    Activist act……they don’t do.

    wankers wank, and wank, and wank, and wank…..

  44. Just Watchin
    December 9, 2012 at 4:19 pm

    Anonymous :

    Just Watchin :
    Activist act……they don’t do.

    wankers wank, and wank, and wank, and wank…..

    Spoken from experience Anon???? LMFAO

  45. December 9, 2012 at 4:47 pm

    #42,

    Yes, I meant #39.

  46. December 9, 2012 at 8:29 pm

    More than six in 10 residents in Republican-dominated Sussex County [NJ] support raising the minimum wage despite near-unanimous opposition from Republican lawmakers, according to an annual “Pulse of Sussex County” survey administered by Sussex County Community College.

    A total of 376 Sussex County residents was surveyed by telephone on a wide range of topics Nov. 14 and 15 by college students enrolled in statistics classes. The survey had a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percent.

    SCCC, in partnership with the New Jersey Herald, has administered “The Pulse of Sussex County” since 2005.

    http://www.njherald.com/story/20297291/minimum-wage-hike-backed-in-poll-of-county

  47. That Man
    December 10, 2012 at 4:53 pm

    @ anonymous guy raising hair about restaurants closing its doors due to being forced to raise the wage.

    the kind of restaurants that would have to; a currently under the threshold (25 employes) and this initiative would not cover them. the ones this would cover are your MC jobs, who after talking about it with he owner of Mickie Dees and Burger regent; the regent can afford it, and he said so enthusiastically, the owner of Mickie’s (who hates me mind you) said he might be in the reed the first few months but Corp. would most likely subsidies the wages to keep the chain opened. i asked him what if the wouldn’t. he said (then it would come out of prophet but he wouldn’t be close to closing doors. he also said he does not wish to get involved in politics, hes fine either way.

    sorry bill i was going to bring it up in the meeting but …

    any ways your fears are unfounded “anonymous guy raising hair about restaurants closing its doors due to being forced to raise the wage.”

    its not an issue and if you asked me we as a society could live with out those fast food restaurants,…except IN and OUT

    we are protecting small business!

  48. That Man
    December 10, 2012 at 5:02 pm

    any ways come to the meeting we will all discuses it their, Bitch to us in person about your deeply held beliefs; and ill go Touma all over your illusions♥

  49. December 11, 2012 at 8:11 am

    this article appeared on Huffington Post:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/donald-cohen/minimum-wage_b_1621767.html

    Minimum Wage Doomsayers Are Still Wrong After 74 Years

    Few American institutions have been subjected to such a consistent stream of vitriol and assault as the minimum wage that celebrates its 74th birthday this week. The first federal minimum wage was established when FDR signed the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) on June 25, 1938. The FLSA also established the 8-hour day, paid overtime and child labor protections into federal law. Since then, it has been amended nine times to expand coverage and to raise the wage to keep it in line with the nation’s economic growth.

    Business leaders, industry associations, politicians and more recently think tanks opposed the FLSA and every legislative amendment since. They said it would destroy American civilization, kill jobs and hurt black people. Business owners predicted they would be forced into bankruptcy.

    One business opponent of the 1938 legislation even warned the minimum wage would lead to the decline of the American empire. In 1937 Guy Harrington of the National Publishers Association testifying before a congressional committee claimed that “Rome, 2,000 years ago, fell because the government began fixing the prices of services and commodities. We, however, know what has always happened when governments have tried to superintend the industry of private persons. The final result has always been distress, misery and despair.”

    That same year the National Association of Manufacturers asserted that the FLSA “constitutes a step in the direction of communism, bolshevism, fascism, and Nazism.”

    Fast forward to 1960 and, despite those warnings, American democracy was alive and well. The American middle class was the largest in world history. That didn’t stop the doomsaying.

    Business lobbies claimed that a 1961 proposal to increase the wage would shutter thousands of businesses across the American heartland. Ernest Kuhn, the manager of the Hanford Hotel in Mason City, Iowa, said that the hotel would be forced to close if the wage was increased to $1.25 per hour. “There is not enough mechanization or automation yet developed to save my business from the minimum wage horror. If minimum wage legislation is passed by Congress, you will be able to buy hotels cheap.”

    Perhaps he was right. The Hanford Inn, operated by the Kuhn Hotel Corp. finally closed in 2009. The minimum wage is clearly a slow-motion killer. The minimum wage has been increased six times since 1961.

    Similarly, Joseph E. Chastain, owner of Lintz’s 10 department stores in Texas and Oklahoma said that a proposed 1966 increase from $1.25 to $1.75 per hour would devastate his business. “No company our size can live under such circumstances. Undoubtedly we would have to liquidate, which is a distressing situation to confront a solvent company that has operated profitably for over 60 years.”

    In yet more evidence of the slow-motion minimum wage disaster, Lintz’s Texas store closed in 2000 and the entire chain closed all their stores in 2007.

    The assault continued unabated in recent decades.

    Economist Milton Friedman, interviewed in Playboy magazine in 1973 said, “I’ve often said the minimum-wage rate is the most anti-Negro law on the books. It’s hard to believe that Friedman hadn’t heard of the Jim Crow laws throughout the south.

    In 1980, presidential candidate, Ronald Reagan, claimed that “The minimum wage has caused more misery and unemployment than anything since the Great Depression.”

    In 1993, the owner of Mega Management Company that owns 95 Burger King franchises in the U.S., Canada and the Netherlands said that “creeping socialism begins at the $5.05 level.” As New York Times columnist Joe Nocera reported, the Burger King Corporation was purchased, leveraged and resold by Goldman Sachs and two private equity firms (including Bain, of course). The private equity firms pulled $1 billion out of the fast food company, funds that according to one Wall St. expert could have been used to help the struggling company — and certainly to pay its employees a higher minimum wage.

    And in 1995, Jack Farris, president of the National Federation of Independent Business claimed that President Clinton’s proposed 90 cents per hour minimum wage hike from $4.25 to $5.15 was “a regressive and job-killing scheme which will put a big dent in small-business hiring.” According to County Business Patterns data, employment in businesses with fewer than 20 employees grew by almost two million workers between 1995 and 2000. Oops.

    Despite these (and more) constant predictions of doom, the minimum wage remains wildly popular in the eyes of the American people. They understand basic economics — when wages go up, people spend more. Without minimum wage laws, employers pay less. They understand what I’ll call “Chris Rock-onomics,” the economic theory the comedian and social commentator described recently like this: “I used to work at McDonald’s making minimum wage. You know what that means when someone pays you minimum wage? You know what your boss was trying to say? It’s like “Hey if I could pay you less, I would, but it’s against the law.”

    Happy Birthday, minimum wage.

  50. In Plain Sight
    December 11, 2012 at 1:07 pm

    It doesn’t take a PhD in blog forensics to see that local issues that are relevant to working families attract the most posts.

    Historians will marvel at the print media that shrank into oblivion due to stubborn and ideological self-destructive censorship of relevant local issues: the 74-year minimum wage debate, political corruption, candidate interviews, voter participation, and the plethora of ignored, (readily available), local statistics on: Rural economics, job losses, the flood of predator industries downtown, foreclosures, bankruptcies, suicides, unemployment, cancers, poverty, homelessness, industrial toxins, infrastructure, schools, crime rates, fresh water depletion, loss of resource lands, and the rapid disappearance of wildlife dependent upon clean water and land.

    When “covered”, these local compelling stories are always devoid of historic context, the power of which is amply illustrated in Bill’s wonderful submission from the Huffington Post.

    Join me at tomorrow’s school board meeting in Mckinnleyville to watch Humboldt’s TV and print media fail again to demand straight answers to difficult, enlightening questions.

    This is the reason most Americans aren’t voting, and why the voters are making big mistakes.

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