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vi·o·lence

Guest Post by Kathy Srabian
Noun
  1. Behavior involving physical force intended to hurt, damage, or kill imagessomeone or something.
  2. Strength of emotion or an unpleasant or destructive natural force

The majority of men are not violent,  The majority of men don’t rape, hit, abuse, or have anger management problems but some do.  This is why women and men around the world will be gathering to break the chain of violence.

Invitation From: Nezzie Wade

This may not be the first or last time you’ll get info on One Billion Rising Eureka.

Please join us Friday, February 15th from 6:pm – 10:pm at the Eureka Women’s Club in concert with the global rising (48 continuous hours) dances in 200 plus countries and territories participating in One Billion Rising. Pretty exciting when you imagine that we are all going to be dancing together to rise for breaking the chain of violence against women and girls. Eileen McGee, Vanessa Vrtiak and I have been working hard, along with volunteers from North Coast Rape Crisis Team and Humboldt Domestic Violence Services, and more, to make this night of dancing and sharing a success.

Violence is a human issue, not just an issue for women and girls; however, One Billion Rising began as a call to action based on the staggering statistic that 1 in 3 women on the planet will be beaten or raped during her lifetime. With a world population at 7 billion plus, this adds up to more than ONE BILLION WOMEN AND GIRLS. One Billion Rising is an Eve Ensler instigated campaign and will again raise lots of money for education, media and shelters and other programs for women and survivors of abuse. All proceeds go to North Coast Rape Crisis Team and Humboldt Domestic Violence Services.

I hope you will gather some folks and come join us on Friday! We will have good food, no host beer and wine, a story table, short video and some great dancing with the music selected for the theme by DJ Goldilocks!  We will also have a 50/50 raffle. All for only $5.00 – $10.00 fee. This charge to get in is on a sliding scale so those who want to contribute more can do so; hopefully, it will allow for many more folks to participate. The dance is an all ages, community-wide event. One Billion Rising is also part of the historic V-Day (now V week!) activities.

If you, or any one you know, would like to volunteer at the event, we will always have things to do. I am also attaching a PSA for the event. Remember, all proceeds go to North Coast Rape Crisis Team and Humboldt Domestic Violence Services. Again, please share as you can. You can learn more by visiting the One Billion Rising Website at http://onebillionrising.org/

Thanks very much!
I hope to see you there.
Nezzie
If you have any questions, please call or email me or onebillioneureka@gmail.com
445-5883

  1. Buzzkill
    February 12, 2013 at 8:03 am | #1

    Also…. The majority of women are not violent. The majority of women don’t rape, hit, abuse, or have anger management problems, but some do.

  2. Kathy Srabian
    February 12, 2013 at 8:28 am | #2

    That’s right Buzzkill. I want you to be very careful to create healthy relationships. Here is a list of things to watch out for : pusheing for quick involvement, jealousy, controlling, unrealistic expectations, isolation, blames others for their own mistakes, makes everyone else responsibile for their feelings, is cruel to animals and children, verbal abuse, rigid gender roles, sudden mood swings, a past of battering, threats of violence.
    Create respect and safety out there for everyone.

  3. HUUFC
    February 12, 2013 at 9:08 am | #3

    Glad to hear I’m in the majority for a change.

  4. Steve
    February 13, 2013 at 7:25 am | #4

    My woman showed me your write up. I slapped her upside her head and told the woman to fetch my coffee.

  5. Kathy
    February 13, 2013 at 8:27 am | #5

    Steve’s comment points out how some think violence is funny and dominance is an acceptable response. This is way events like Rise Up are important. Sadly our culture will accept violence.

  6. Anonymous
    February 13, 2013 at 8:37 am | #6

    Steve didn’t get the memo that jokes about violence against women are just as vile as racist jokes.

  7. Mitch
    February 13, 2013 at 8:39 am | #7

    It’s genuinely difficult for those who have always lived lives of invisible privilege to understand what it is like to not have that privilege. That applies equally to those who are privileged in some ways but clearly not privileged in others. The humor is an understandable, if not particularly charming, reaction to being confronted with uncomfortable information about what happens, unfairly, to people who are different in some way.

    In some cases, as people’s eyes open, the humor becomes less funny and the genuine awfulness of the situation sinks in. In other cases, the humorist continues to think THEY are the victimized party, because “politically correct” people “just have no sense of humor.”

  8. Anonymous
    February 13, 2013 at 12:53 pm | #8

    And yet others feel that “politically correct” people go around in a perpetual state of being offended by everyone and everything that does not conform completely to their own way of thinking.

  9. Mitch
    February 13, 2013 at 1:23 pm | #9

    I’m sure there are people who seem to be offended quite a bit, #8.

    Do you consider comment #4 to be funny?

    Do you think someone who doesn’t see any humor in comment #4 is just too easily offended to join the fun?

  10. Politically Incorrect
    February 13, 2013 at 2:52 pm | #10

    How about “No violence against anyone”?

  11. Just Watchin
    February 13, 2013 at 3:01 pm | #11

    Mitch :It’s genuinely difficult for those who have always lived lives of invisible privilege to understand what it is like to not have that privilege. That applies equally to those who are privileged in some ways but clearly not privileged in others. The humor is an understandable, if not particularly charming, reaction to being confronted with uncomfortable information about what happens, unfairly, to people who are different in some way.
    In some cases, as people’s eyes open, the humor becomes less funny and the genuine awfulness of the situation sinks in. In other cases, the humorist continues to think THEY are the victimized party, because “politically correct” people “just have no sense of humor.”

    What the hell is ” invisible privliege” ??

  12. Anonymous
    February 13, 2013 at 3:22 pm | #12

    Invisible privilege (correct spelling): An example – you walk into a store, look around, and purchase whatever you want without any incident. You don’t even think twice about your ease of doing this. However, if you are different (take your pick – race, gender-orientation, unusual hair/dress), you are followed and suspected of malfeasance.
    A few years ago a dreadlocked African American male (with a law degree) use to walk around an upscale white suburban neighborhood of San Diego. He was continuously stopped without cause by police and followed by “neighborhood watch” types. The “invisible privilege” is that I can walk around that neighborhood and people will smile, nod, and give me friendly waves (even the cops). Guess what I look like.

  13. Mitch
    February 13, 2013 at 3:37 pm | #13

    JW,

    There are a lot of definitions of invisible privilege. Rather than try to define it, let me offer one or two examples.

    If you’re a white teenager wandering around a highly-white neighborhood, you might not attract the police attention that some other teenager might. The police might simply be responding to a perception or reality that there have been many crimes by, say, black teenagers. But, in your daily life, you as a black teenager know that you are far more likely than your white friends to be stopped and frisked, or just followed around with a lack of trust. Maybe that keeps you from going to certain neighborhoods at night, despite your being an honors student and a child of a very wealthy family.

    If you’re named Tyrone and applying for a job, you’ll never know whether your name caused your application to be handled differently than one from Thomas. According to this study — http://www.nber.org/digest/sep03/w9873.html — there was a 50% difference in response rates to job applicants solely based on changing the name on the application to to one that “sounds black.”

    These two examples are race-based, but there are equivalents around gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, religious affiliation and other categorizations we all use all the time.

    People in the majority culture can remain blissfully ignorant of the special privileges they have by virtue of being members of the majority. But the privileges become very apparent when, as a member of a minority, you see that most people have them and you don’t. So perhaps invisible is the wrong word.

  14. HUUFC
    February 13, 2013 at 3:37 pm | #14

    Thanks for something else to worry about. Why, but why, did the black male walk around white neighborhoods all day, didn’t he need to go to work?

  15. Mitch
    February 13, 2013 at 3:40 pm | #15

    Perhaps he was working, HUUFC, as a salesperson? But it would be hard to get the sales job if the non-racist sales supervisor realized that you’d be trailed everywhere by the police, so that’s probably not it. Maybe he lived in the neighborhood?

  16. Just Watchin
    February 13, 2013 at 3:41 pm | #16

    Anonymous :
    Invisible privilege (correct spelling): An example – you walk into a store, look around, and purchase whatever you want without any incident. You don’t even think twice about your ease of doing this. However, if you are different (take your pick – race, gender-orientation, unusual hair/dress), you are followed and suspected of malfeasance.
    A few years ago a dreadlocked African American male (with a law degree) use to walk around an upscale white suburban neighborhood of San Diego. He was continuously stopped without cause by police and followed by “neighborhood watch” types. The “invisible privilege” is that I can walk around that neighborhood and people will smile, nod, and give me friendly waves (even the cops). Guess what I look like.

    Thanks for the spelling correction. In keeping with the theme, I’m guessing that if you were sure that I was white and not retarded, you would have given me a smile,nod, and friendly wave. I asked a simple question. No need to be a dick about a typo.

  17. HUUFC
    February 13, 2013 at 4:03 pm | #17

    In 1983 Kolender vs Lawson was decided by the US supreme Court. 30 years ago. 30 years ago a civil rights activist challenged the Police practice in San Diego of demanding an identification without probable cause. The activist won the case and police can no longer stop anyone without reason and demand an drivers license or whatever. 30 years ago, sigh. Can you liberals get over it and stop using the word racist at the drop of the hat?

    BTW he was working alright got the ACLU to sign on and went all the way to the supreme’s.

  18. Mitch
    February 13, 2013 at 4:12 pm | #18

    HUUFC,

    Some folks don’t seem to have got your memo: https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ie=UTF-8#hl=en&safe=off&tbo=d&sclient=psy-ab&q=stop+and+frisk&oq=stop+and+frisk&gs_l=hp.3..0l3j0i7.4591.14525.0.14761.2.2.0.0.0.0.138.138.0j1.1.0.les%3B..0.0…1c.1.2.hp.vHu-hEZFXag&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_cp.r_qf.&bvm=bv.42261806,bs.1,d.b2I&fp=8bb62755c027473d&biw=1271&bih=871

  19. Anonymous
    February 13, 2013 at 4:19 pm | #19

    The fact that you think a lawsuit settled 30 years ago made this bias stop is evidence that you don’t see it happening (why Mitch used the word invisible) and assume everyone is now treated the same. Yes, cops can’t stop you without reason – but reasons are not hard to come by, and people can still make life miserable for anyone different. If you don’t believe me, grow a beard, put on a turban and book a flight on an airplane.

  20. Dan
    February 13, 2013 at 4:31 pm | #20

    “The Department’s own reports on its stop-and-frisk activity confirm what many people in communities of color across the city have long known: The police are stopping hundreds of thousands of law abiding New Yorkers every year, and the vast majority are black and Latino.”

    Imagine the Phoenix area under Sheriff Arpaio.
    HUUFC and JW have you considered travel?

  21. Just Watchin
    February 13, 2013 at 4:52 pm | #21

    Dan :
    “The Department’s own reports on its stop-and-frisk activity confirm what many people in communities of color across the city have long known: The police are stopping hundreds of thousands of law abiding New Yorkers every year, and the vast majority are black and Latino.”
    Imagine the Phoenix area under Sheriff Arpaio.
    HUUFC and JW have you considered travel?

    What kind of dumbass question is that? I traveled for a living for 30 years, and in areas that were rough. I didn’t venture out at night for a stroll, not because I was afraid of police harassment, but because my next stop would have been a bodybag. (Yea….I’m white).

  22. Anonymous
    February 13, 2013 at 6:20 pm | #22

    I heard lots of black men are sporting “LAPD don’t shoot, I’m not Chris Dorner.” t-shirts and bumper stickers.

  23. Kathy Srabian
    February 13, 2013 at 6:24 pm | #23

    Politically Incorrect :

    How about “No violence against anyone”?

  24. Anonymoose
    February 14, 2013 at 10:45 pm | #24

    When blacks and Latinos are many more times likely to commit crime, is stopping blacks & Latinos more often a racist action or just plain commen sense?

    That kind of PC nonsense produces absurdities like TSA screeners having to frisk 80 year old white grandmas traveling with their 3 year old grandchildren to the same porportion as frisking 20 year old Arab men traveling alone with one way tickets and no luggage.

    That is why this country is doomed.

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