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Operation Redwood

operation_redwoodA new childrens’ book released this month features a familiar Humboldt theme: an “evil” CEO intent on cutting ancient Redwood trees — and protesters’ plans to save them.

Here’s the blurb from the Operation Redwood website:

Waking up alone in an abandoned office, Julian Carter-Li intercepts an angry e-mail message meant for his high-powered uncle:

SIBLEY CARTER IS A MORON AND A WORLD-CLASS JERK!!!

With that, OPERATION REDWOOD is set in motion as Julian discovers his Uncle Sibley’s plan to log an ancient redwood grove in Northern California.  Will there be “consequences” when Sibley discovers Julian’s been tampering with his e-mail?  Can Julian find out more about Robin, the intriguing girl who sent the message?  Can he escape math camp for the summer and help save Big Tree Grove?   Is Operation Redwood doomed to failure . . . or is there hope?

The website features an educational page on The Redwood Forest with links to the science, history and geography of Sequoia Sempervirens.

  1. April 15, 2009 at 9:03 am

    Speaking of redwoods, this just in from the Bay Area Coalition for Headwaters:

    Fraud lawsuit against Maxxam and Hurwitz

    This time in Oakland court: Monday, April 20

    It’s never too late to seek justice.

    We finally got corporate raider extraordinaire Charles Hurwitz out of our forests in California—after two decades of rape and ruin in the redwoods—when Maxxam’s subsidiary Pacific Lumber went bankrupt in 2007, and Maxxam did not play the winning card. But Maxxam and Charlie Hurwitz himself profited mightily from their disastrous and often illegal corporate reign in California’s north coast, and Hurwitz was never really held accountable. There is a glimmer of hope: a lawsuit coming to trial in Oakland, Calif. will take another whack at that accountability, and Hurwitz himself is a named defendant for this round in court.

    Jury selection is scheduled to start at 8:30 am Mon., April 20 in the courtroom of Judge Claudia Wilken, room 2, 4th floor, 1301 Clay St. in downtown Oakland.

    We could use note-takers, as we cannot be in court every day of the (expected) 10-day trial. Contact us at 510-548-3113 or reply to this email. You must present i.d. to enter the Federal Courthouse.

    background:
    Richard Wilson, former head of the state’s Dept. of Forestry (CDF), along with Chris Maranto, a CDF forester, filed the suit in 2006, alleging fraud in the Headwaters Forest Deal–negotiated over several years and signed in 1999. Specifically the suit says the logging company defrauded the State of California out of hundreds of millions of dollars by manipulating the deal with false data. Everyone from Bill Clinton to Sen. Dianne Feinstein to Hurwitz was in on the negotiations, jockeying for the right to claim they had “saved” Headwaters Forest, and Maxxam took home close to half a billion dollars plus additional forestland for a scant 7400 acres transferred to the state. Hurwitz got an $11 million personal bonus. The fraud relates to the Sustained Yield Plan that the corporation was required to submit, which, it turns out, was manipulated to show logging and regeneration projections that were impossible and falsified. This resulted in Hurwitz not only getting the $480 million and property, but cleared the way for continued overlogging of the redwoods.

    The case, technically a whistle-blower case, involves heavy-hitters. Seven-term Congressman Pete McCloskey, who co-authored the Endangered Species Act and ran for president against Richard Nixon on an anti-war platform is part of the legal team via his law firm Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy, with Joseph Cotchett serving as lead counsel. The firm has gone up against the likes of AIG, Lehman Brothers, and B of A, counting scores of anti-trust, whistle-blower, corporate fraud and class action lawsuits in their filings. Defending the former Pacific Lumber, Maxxam and Hurwitz is the law firm of Morrison & Foerster; James Brosnahan serving as lead counsel. Brosnahan is legendary is his own right, recognized as one of the top trial lawyers in the U.S., but sitting at a legal table on the other side of the fence from McCloskey’s firm, defending CEOs, breast implant manufacturer facing liability, and was on the team of independent counsel in the Iran Contra cases.

    Hurwitz could be ordered to pay damages equal to three times the government’s losses in the Deal, if plaintiffs prevail.

    How appropriate in this time of ponzi schemes and public funds rip-offs that one of the greediest corporate raiders could get his due. Think justice and just desserts.

    You can get more background info from Bay Area Coalition for Headwaters at http://www.headwaterspreserve.org

  2. Da Man
    April 15, 2009 at 11:12 am

    Earth First! said the evil logger- then we log the other planets…

  3. beel
    April 15, 2009 at 1:49 pm

    Great news. Please keep us updated.
    I hope Hurwitz gets what he deserves.

    H, a redwood tree is more accurately written Sequoia sempervirens with a capitol letter designating the Genus level and a small letter designating the species level in a taxonomic classification scheme.

  4. annon
    April 15, 2009 at 7:02 pm

    every acre of timberland taken off the tax rolls is an acre of tax yield that helps keep you welfare bums subsisting.

  5. darlingtonia
    April 15, 2009 at 8:51 pm

    Nice entice and trap, H.

  6. April 15, 2009 at 9:15 pm

    It was a nice succession, yes.

  7. April 29, 2009 at 5:42 pm

    Very cute book.

    But should minors treesit? :)

  8. April 29, 2009 at 5:43 pm

    Should adults?

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