Home > Eureka California > Just like last year

Just like last year

It appears the June rains of 2010 will hold an encore.

  1. Anonymous
  2. s. dole
    May 31, 2011 at 8:05 am
  3. May 31, 2011 at 8:41 am

    I’m replacing my stringbeans with watercress.

  4. Anonymous
    May 31, 2011 at 10:29 am

    must be global warming

  5. Scott
    May 31, 2011 at 10:33 am

    Aaarrrgh! From NOAA:
    “WE ARE ABOUT 31 DAYS AWAY FROM THE DRIEST MONTH OF THE WATER YEAR. IT IS NOT COMPLETELY OUT OF THE QUESTION FOR US TO SEE A CONTINUATION OF BELOW NORMAL TEMPERATURES AND RAIN THROUGH JULY. IN JULY OF 2007 WE SAW 0.88 INCHES OF RAIN ON THE 17TH. GOING BACK EVEN FARTHER IN THE RECORDS…1983 SAW 0.89 INCHES ON THE FIRST OF JULY. HOT AND DRY WEATHER TYPICAL FOR JULY MAY INDEED BE ON STANDBY UNTIL AUG.”

  6. Anonymous
    May 31, 2011 at 10:38 am

    The rain may come down
    and ruin your day
    But the afternoon winds
    will turn your lawn into hay.
    Burma Shave.

  7. Plain Jane
    May 31, 2011 at 11:57 am

    Keep Calm and Carry On
    By Bill McKibben
    Caution: It is vitally important not to make connections. When you see pictures of rubble like this week’s shots from Joplin, Missouri, you should not ask yourself: I wonder if this is somehow related to the huge tornado outbreak three weeks ago in Tuscaloosa, or the enormous outbreak a couple of weeks before that—together they comprised the most active April for tornadoes in our history. But that doesn’t mean a thing.

    It is far better to think of these as isolated, unpredictable, discrete events. It is not advised to try and connect them in your mind with, say, the fires now burning across Texas—fires that have burned more of America by this date than any year in our history. Texas, and adjoining parts of Oklahoma and New Mexico, are drier than they’ve ever been—the drought is worse than the Dust Bowl. But do not wonder if it’s somehow connected.

    If you did wonder, you’d have to also wonder about whether this year’s record snowfalls and rainfalls across the Midwest—resulting in record flooding across the Mississippi—could somehow be related. And if you did that, then you might find your thoughts wandering to, oh, global warming. To the fact that climatologists have been predicting for years that as we flood the atmosphere with carbon we will also start both drying and flooding the planet, since warm air holds more water vapor than cold.

    It’s far smarter to repeat to yourself, over and over, the comforting mantra that no single weather event can ever be directly tied to climate change. There have been tornadoes before, and floods—that’s the important thing. Just be careful to make sure you don’t let yourself wonder why all these records are happening at once: why we’ve had unprecedented megafloods from Australia to Pakistan in the last year. Why it’s just now that the Arctic has melted for the first time in thousands of years. Focus on the immediate casualties, watch the videotape from the store cameras as the shelves are blown over. Look at the anchorman up to the chest of his waders in the rising river.

    Because if you asked yourself what it meant that the Amazon has just come through its second hundred-year-drought in the last four years, or that the pine forests across the western part of this continent have been obliterated by a beetle in the last decade—well, you might have to ask other questions. Like, should President Obama really just have opened a huge swath of Wyoming to new coal-mining? Should Secretary of State this summer sign a permit allowing a huge new pipeline to carry oil from the tar sands of Alberta? You might have to ask yourself: do we have a bigger problem than four-dollar-a-gallon gasoline?

    Better to join with the US House of Representatives, which earlier this spring voted 240-184 to defeat a resolution saying simply “climate change is occurring, is caused largely by human activities, and poses significant risks for public health and welfare.” Propose your own physics; ignore physics altogether. Just don’t start asking yourself if last year’s failed grain harvest from the Russian heatwave, and Queensland’s failed grain harvest from its record flood, and France and Germany’s current drought-related crop failures, and the death of the winter wheat crop in Texas, and the inability of Midwestern farmers to get corn planted in their sodden fields might somehow be related. Surely the record food prices are just freak outliers, not signs of anything systemic.

    It’s very important to stay completely calm. If you got upset about any of this, you might forget how important it is not to disrupt the record profits of our fossil fuel companies. If worst ever did come to worst, it’s reassuring to remember what the US Chamber of Commerce told the EPA in a recent filing: there’s no need to worry because “populations can acclimatize to warmer climates via a range of range of behavioral, physiological, and technological adaptations.” I’m pretty sure that’s what they’re telling themselves in Joplin today.

  8. May 31, 2011 at 11:57 am

    In my Heaven it rains every day, while the sun shines through it.
    Human beings should worship water that falls from the sky.

    Think about it, if too much water becomes our planetary problem; we have a good chance at survival. If too little water becomes our problem; we are doomed.

  9. Anonymous
    May 31, 2011 at 12:10 pm

    Great post, jane. Also, if and when you happen to accidentally or intentionally connect some of the dots, it’s best to pretend the planet is wiping out every facet of life in a genuine extinction process completely on its own accord. There are several comfort zones in which your mind can remain complacent to the issue in this way, based on planetary orbits, the earth’s core, or even a good ol’ fashion galactic anomaly.

    If, however, you accidentally or intentionally connect some of the dots with your eyes open to the society in which we all live, making note of the billions of vehicles and industrial polluters, the governments of the world have provided a safe scapegoat for your peace of mind to relax within. You can blame carbon dioxide. It’s plant food!

  10. What Now
    May 31, 2011 at 12:17 pm

    Great post, Jane.

  11. Plain Jane
    May 31, 2011 at 12:29 pm

    Thanks go to my friend, Charlie, for sending it to me. People with a religious twist may have no concern for the planet since they’re soon going to be raptured away from the problems and they want the earth to be the hell that is prophesied for the rest of us. What’s even scarier is the potential for self-fulfilling prophesy if one of the wackos gains access to the nuclear trigger and decides they’re the Archangel Gabriel and air raid sirens his trumpet.

  12. anonymous
    May 31, 2011 at 1:29 pm

    Didn’t the rapture just happen in Joplin? Only a day or two off predictions. The unraptured must be feeling so unfairly left out.

  13. Plain Jane
    May 31, 2011 at 1:33 pm

    More on the subject of climate change:

    http://www.truthout.org/sky-really-falling/1306847032

  14. Chicken Little
    May 31, 2011 at 2:00 pm

    Hey PJ; the sky is falling, just look up!

  15. Plain Jane
    May 31, 2011 at 2:06 pm

    Look up in this rain you could drown.

  16. Anonymous
    May 31, 2011 at 6:18 pm

    I was joking when I mentioned global warming !!!!!!

  17. High Finance
    May 31, 2011 at 8:45 pm

    You can’t joke with an environmental extremist !

  18. Anonymous
    May 31, 2011 at 10:07 pm

    This winter we enjoyed a La Nina condition. This results from lower than normal sea surface temperatures in the Pacific. The temperatures oscillate with time, from El Nino to La Nina, and neutral conditions between. The sea surface temperatures determine much of our sensible weather. The trend is changing from La Nina to neutral, but cool temps will prevail for more weeks this summer.

    From the Climate Prediction Center, May 5th:

    Current observed trends, along with forecasts from nearly all of the ENSO models, indicate La Niña will continue to weaken in the coming months, with a return to ENSO-neutral during May-June-July 2011 (three-month average in the Nino-3.4 index between –0.5°C and +0.5°C; Fig. 6). Thereafter, the majority of models and all multi-model forecasts (shown by the thick lines) predict ENSO-neutral conditions to continue through the remainder of 2011. However, the status of ENSO beyond the Northern Hemisphere summer remains uncertain due to lower model forecast skill at longer lead times.
    La Niña will continue to have global impacts even as the episode diminishes. Expected La Niña impacts during May-July 2011 include suppressed convection over the west-central tropical Pacific Ocean, and enhanced convection over Indonesia. Potential La Niña impacts in the United States include an enhanced chance for below-average precipitation across southeastern Texas and Louisiana, and an increased chance of below-average Current observed trends, along with forecasts from nearly all of the ENSO models, indicate La Niña will continue to weaken in the coming months, with a return to ENSO-neutral during May-June-July 2011 (three-month average in the Nino-3.4 index between –0.5°C and +0.5°C; Fig. 6). Thereafter, the majority of models and all multi-model forecasts (shown by the thick lines) predict ENSO-neutral conditions to continue through the remainder of 2011. However, the status of ENSO beyond the Northern Hemisphere summer remains uncertain due to lower model forecast skill at longer lead times.
    La Niña will continue to have global impacts even as the episode diminishes. Expected La Niña impacts during May-July 2011 include suppressed convection over the west-central tropical Pacific Ocean, and enhanced convection over Indonesia. Potential La Niña impacts in the United States include an enhanced chance for below-average precipitation across southeastern Texas and Louisiana, and an increased chance of below-average temperatures for the Pacific Northwest (see 3-month seasonal outlook released on April 21st, 2011).

  19. Anonymous
    June 1, 2011 at 1:19 am

    What form of industrial pollution caused the last Ice Age?

  20. Walt
    June 1, 2011 at 6:16 am

    They’re rioting in Africa, they’re starving in Spain.
    There’s hurricanes in Florida, and Texas needs rain.
    The whole world is festering with unhappy souls.
    The French hate the Germans, the Germans hate the Poles.
    Italians hate Yugoslavs, South Africans hate the Dutch.
    And I don’t like anybody very much!

    But we can be tranquil, and thankful, and proud,
    For mans’ been endowed with a mushroom-shaped cloud.
    And we know for certain that some lovely day
    Someone will set the spark off, and we will all be blown away.

    They’re rioting in Africa, there’s strife in Iran.
    What nature doesn’t do to us, will be done by our fellow man.

    –Sheldon Harnick

  21. Ed
    June 1, 2011 at 9:42 am

    Everybody quit your belly aching. It’s universally known the only way to stop the rain is to buy more firewood. It’s just as true as making it rain by watering your yard.

  22. Percy
    June 1, 2011 at 10:30 am

    Let me answer your astute observation with another question Anonymous 1:19: What changed the earth from being flat to being round?

  23. Bolithio
    June 2, 2011 at 7:13 am

    Dont draw too many conclusions without a proper understanding of these issues. And remember, its not the oil companies, were after, its us, the masses who need to change to better our world.

    and to quote once again my favorite band:

    Hey scientist, please save us from our rainy days,
    Because your counterpart in the magic art is manufacturing judgment day.
    There’s a fell wind blowing out of the east, bringing famine, drought and plague.
    Well now, at least that’s what they say.

    Rain fell like judgment across my windowpane.
    Said it fell like judgment, but it was only rain…

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s