Home > marijuana > In which a Humboldt County resident reviews an episode of Weeds

In which a Humboldt County resident reviews an episode of Weeds

[Featured comment by tra]

Well, six episodes into its seventh season and finally the show “Weeds” has worked Humboldt County into its plot line.

Unfortunately, the episode is a bit heavy on the shotgun-brandishing, booby-trapping stereotype.  No actual local scenery (I’m assuming it wasn’t filmed anywhere near here). Nor was there any local “greenery” — the plants were super-fake looking, and even if they were real, I think any actual outdoor grower in Humboldt would be pretty embarrassed by those scraggly-looking things!  But for a mainstream TV show, I guess it would be silly to expect something a bit more realistic.

I suppose we’ll have to see where the plot line goes from here (at the end of the episode, several of the main characters remain in “Humboldt,” so presumably we’ll see a lot more of that part of the storyline in the next few episodes).  But in general it seems like this pop culture exposure will probably be good publicity for the Humboldt “brand,” for Humboldt’s biggest cash crop — especially the outdoor variety.  (The characters have a little talk about how although indoor/hydro is “flawless” outdoor is much more “beautiful.”)

Wouldn’t it be great if in some of the next few episodes, the characters discover at least a few of the other wonderful and unique things about Humboldt — the amazing landscapes, beaches, rivers, mountains, our quirky little towns and cities, etc.

  1. 69er
    August 2, 2011 at 10:51 pm

    I guess we do need some kind of exposure to lure in some tourists with their money. There has been asevere lack of ads recently. 2 of the publications I receive regularly that at one ran ads promoting the area are missing them as of late. The Sunset magazine and Via, a publication by CSAA, once called Motorland have been void of them lately, mustbe due to lack of funds by the local promoters?

  2. Thorstein Veblen
    August 2, 2011 at 10:54 pm

    “Wouldn’t it be great if in some of the next few episodes, the characters discover at least a few of the other wonderful and unique things about Humboldt”

    Uh, maybe not. Geez, global warming/climate change will bring enough new people here. I’m kinda warming up to isolation myself. If we don’t keep a low profile, pretty soon Eureka will be LA, and Fortuna will be Bakersfield.

  3. tra
    August 2, 2011 at 11:08 pm

    “…pretty soon Eureka will be LA…”

    I wouldn’t bet on it.

  4. Anonymous
    August 3, 2011 at 6:34 am

    Luring people to the humboldt brand is wishful thinking. Why drive all the way here when it’s produced abundantly with the same strains and techniques everywhere?

  5. Decline To State
    August 3, 2011 at 7:27 am

    Uh, maybe not. Geez, global warming/climate change will bring enough new people here. I’m kinda warming up to isolation myself. If we don’t keep a low profile, pretty soon Eureka will be LA, and Fortuna will be Bakersfield.

    Yeah, next thing you know they’ll be wanting to straighten out the road in Richardson Grove and stuff! And then Eureka would be JUST LIKE LA!

  6. Anonymous
    August 3, 2011 at 7:40 am

    I doubt Eureka will ever be like Louisiana.

  7. August 3, 2011 at 9:17 am

    It was most likely filmed on a set and the “plants” were fake and just part of the set. The reference I heard was in one line, I don’t have the exact words, but it was mentioned, “Humboldt County/taking property rights seriously/individually”.

    It is an entertaing show followed by Laura Linney in The Big C on Showtime.

  8. Anonymous
    August 3, 2011 at 10:14 am

    In case you haven’t been paying any attention – the whole “gonna be LA” thing is just so bogus an argument. Look at the General Plan – updated or not – there is not the buildable area to become LA. Give it up. Maybe some of you should lay off the pot for awhile and get more rational and not so paranoid. Drugs will do that to you. And the question is always, so where do you move here from? Ok for you, but not for others? Weird.

  9. Anne on a Mouse
    August 3, 2011 at 12:41 pm

    I think any actual outdoor grower in Humboldt would be pretty embarrassed by those scraggly-looking things!

    To me, the title “Weed” is an indication of how little respect they have for it.

  10. tra
    August 3, 2011 at 3:25 pm

    Actually, the name of the show is “Weeds” (plural). I’m not sure exactly what the idea is there. Any theories?

  11. Anne on a Mouse
    August 3, 2011 at 5:32 pm

    Ooops, I missed the “s” somehow. I guess there’s more to the title than met my eye. Never saw the show but at Wikipedia creator Jenji Kohan says:

    The title, according to Kohan, refers “to a lot of things”, including marijuana and widow’s weeds; however, it mainly alludes to “hardy plants struggling to survive.”

  12. August 3, 2011 at 6:15 pm

    They did a better job when they showed Humboldt on “Lost”…

  13. tra
    August 3, 2011 at 7:11 pm

    Well the large pot leaf in their logo suggests it mainly alludes to marijuana, but I can see how “hardy plants struggling to survive” might be first among the potential double entendres.

  14. Plain Jane
    August 3, 2011 at 7:37 pm

    It’s been called weed as long as I’ve known of its existence. I’ve heard that trains hauling hemp scattered seeds all across the country where it grew like weeds, maybe that’s the origin.

  15. Thorstein Veblen
    August 3, 2011 at 9:02 pm

    Well, at least nobody disagrees that Fortuna will be Bakersfield.

    And Weeds seemed to move away from believable sillyness after the first few seasons. I haven’t seen it for a couple of years now.

    My grandpa called it loco-weed, he was from Texas.

  16. 69er
    August 3, 2011 at 10:47 pm

    I remember it being called “weed” in late ’30’s and early 40’s in the logging camp where I was living. It was used extensively by the south of the border railroad and camp maintenance workers and a few of the others as well. The term “loco weed” was also used at times.

  17. Plain Jane
    August 3, 2011 at 11:46 pm

    That’s pretty funny considering how mild those strains were compared to what is grown today, 69er.

  18. August 10, 2011 at 7:38 am

    My Grandmother talked about some people smoking ” loco weed” in Kentucky when she was a child ( as well as using cocaine)
    . That would have been the 1920’s. It wasn’t illegal in those days.

  19. Aralia californica
    August 12, 2011 at 10:11 pm

    I actually didn’t hear any reference to Humboldt, what I heard was a reference to the woman living in a pygmy forest, meaning mendocino to me

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