Home > Humboldt County, Occupy Wall Street > Humboldt on the Occupied map

Humboldt on the Occupied map

More than 99 locations are noted on this interactive Occupy Wall Street map showing protests around the country, including Humboldt County. The above image is a screenshot.  Click on it or go to Mother Jones to get the full interactive experience.

  1. Mitch
    October 8, 2011 at 7:07 am

    There isn’t a single college town in Nebraska or the Dakotas?

  2. Ponder z
    October 8, 2011 at 7:16 am

    First off, I agree we need some reform on Wall st., to control corruption. But the salary a person makes is his/her own doing. A corporation will not get a premium CEO for $150k/year.

    The current administration is corrupt. Solyndra is just one we know of. Yet on the other hand the administration is beating the drum of change for wealth redistribution. It is not their business to do this. This is an act of marxism. The more of you clowns that buy into this, the deeper we slide from a free country to a dictatorship. We don’t want big government moving our money around to influence votes.

    I bet every on of these red dots is within a mile of a medical marijuana dispensary.

    Stay stupid my friends.

  3. Dan
    October 8, 2011 at 7:58 am

    Mitch, N. Dakota has the only state bank in the country,
    Wall Street screw-ups left N. Dakota relatively unscathed.
    I believe they have a unemployment rate around three percent.

  4. Ed
    October 8, 2011 at 8:00 am

    If the middle class declines much further, we’ll be happy to occupy a cardboard box.

  5. Bolithio
    October 8, 2011 at 8:59 am

    A corporation will not get a premium CEO for $150k/year.

    Now thats BS.

  6. Anonymous
    October 8, 2011 at 9:03 am

    “the salary a person makes is his/her own doing”? Ha! Ponder Z-thanks for the morning laugh. And you don’t want big government moving our money around influencing votes? You want big corporations moving our money around influencing votes? You’re a riot!

  7. Plain Jane
    October 8, 2011 at 9:12 am

    Peer benchmarking is why CEO salaries are skyrocketing. Packing your board with buddies and other corporate CEO’s (whose salaries are set by similar boards using peer benchmarking), essentially escalating each others salaries to increase their own, is why they make so much. Because, don’t you know, ALL CEO’s are “above average.” Must be why things are working so well in this country.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/cozy-relationships-and-peer-benchmarking-send-ceos-pay-soaring/2011/09/22/gIQAgq8NJL_story.html

  8. Plain Jane
    October 8, 2011 at 9:16 am

    Hey Bolithio, off topic, but do you know what would cause a fir tree to have masses of pine cones in the top couple of branch layers but none in lower branches?

  9. Plain Jane
    October 8, 2011 at 9:25 am

    I meant fir cones, of course. :P

  10. October 8, 2011 at 9:40 am

    It’s so hard not to get angry at the propaganda-machine’s attack on the whole movement. When they acknowledge them at all. The common talking point is that they don’t have a clear message. “They’re unclear on exactly what they’re demanding. They’re just a bunch of stoned losers acting out of envy.”
    Forget the “Bastille” We (pissed off patriots) need to storm the FCC. As long as the Corps. has complete control of the media, fearful Americans will continue to betray their own future.

  11. October 8, 2011 at 10:16 am

    Talk about “Staying Stupid”

  12. Dan
    October 8, 2011 at 11:31 am

    Think about it, N. Dakota with state owned bank weathers financial storm of century-
    socialism or responsible capitalism?

    The cheerleaders for status quo have a lot of explaining to do.

  13. Anonymous
    October 8, 2011 at 11:40 am

    “Occupy” and the Tea Party are two sides of the same coin: frustration at the lack of opportunity and the shrinking middle class.

    The difference is the Tea Party blames taxes and Occupy blames Wall St and Corporations. An analysis of taxes shows tax rates have remained level and even decreased (especially for the wealthy) while incomes have declined. Unfortunately the Ponder Zs and the Tea Party types have found the wrong scape goat and are blindly supporting the people (Perry, Palin, Romney, even Obama) who have been (or carried on the tradition of) screwing them for the last 20+ years.

    I really wish these two groups could come together and overcome the “divide and conquer” strategy to realize they are both frustrated with the same process – enrichment of the 1% at the expense of the middle class.

  14. Bolithio
    October 8, 2011 at 11:53 am

    Well Im not an arborist, so Im not as good at assessing individual trees…but generally ‘coning’ out can be a sign of stress. I would watch the tree carefully for other indicators of stress. Loss of pigment in the leaves, thinning out of the leaves, and pitching out from the bole of the tree are the most obvious indicators.

    If you really want to get into it, Id use this (warning! this is about 20mb):
    http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_gtr241.pdf

    Hint: Use the Host-Pest Index to narrow down what could effect DF.

    You could cross reference to this too if you wanted, but I find this one harder to use because it lacks the Host-Pest Index.

    http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/spf/publications/foresthealth/manual_090507.pdf

  15. Anonymous
    October 8, 2011 at 12:07 pm

    PJ, you B crazy as usual. Talked to many HSU proffs and they all just roll their eyes. This is pure political BS supported by a failure who will try anything to continue his reign of “stupidity”. Many problems in our society,non of which are solved by lazy,unproductive whinners. Yes PJ the unions are non producers, sorry to say as I believe in good unions.

  16. Plain Jane
    October 8, 2011 at 12:11 pm

    I wish someone would put leg humper back on its leash.

  17. Plain Jane
    October 8, 2011 at 12:11 pm

    Thanks Bolithio.

  18. skippy
    October 8, 2011 at 12:26 pm

    As the New York protests enter their fourth week, the size of the crowd grew with as many as 5,000 on Wednesday. The numbers still pale to the 50,000 or 60,000 protesters gathering at the IMF and World Bank a decade ago. Or, the 250,000 people marching against the Iraq war in 2003. Or the New York demonstration against the Bush administration at the 2004 Republican Convention that organizers claim drew 500,000.

    What are others saying? Some curious quotes:

    Rush Limbaugh characterized the Occupy Wall Street protesters as “human debris.Ann Coulter referred to them as “Nazis” while House of Representatives Majority Leader Eric Cantor said they’re “growing mobs trying to divide the country”. Glenn Beck said the movement will lead to “gas chambers, guillotines and millions dead.” In under one minute, Fox News’ Peter Johnson called them a “Flash mob in search of a message” who are really “web cam Wobblies” displaying “all the trappings of revolution” but are really just “the Little Rascals gone camping” even though they are “not sure what the message is ” but “they’ve really become the unintentional dupes of a 2012 election.

    President Obama, addressed reporters simply saying, “I think people are frustrated and, you know, the protesters are giving voice to a more broad-based frustration about how our financial system works.” The White House has yet to officially comment on Occupy Wall Street.

    Two Republican presidential hopefuls weighed in: Herman Cain dismissed the protesters by saying the are “ “anti-capitalism” and “anti-free market.” “They are not working on the right problem, Wall Street didn’t write those failed policies (and) spend a trillion dollars. You can demonstrate all you want on Wall Street, but the problem is 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue,” Cain said. Meanwhile, Mitt Romney called the protest “class warfare,” adding, “I’m just trying to occupy the White House” before slipping into his waiting car.

    What they’re trying to do is take the jobs away from people working in this city. If the jobs they are trying to get rid of… go away, we’re not going to have any money to pay our municipal employees or clean our parks or anything else,New York Michael Bloomberg said. He also noted, “There are some people with legitimate complaints.

    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke told the Joint Economic Committee that he understands the protesters’ frustrations. “I would just say very generally, I think people are quite unhappy with the state of the economy and what’s happening. They blame, with some justification, the problems in the financial sector for getting us into this mess, and they’re dissatisfied with the policy response here in Washington. And at some level, I can’t blame them.

    Our local commentator Ernie put it a bit more succinctly: “Give us a good job, so we can support our families, with enough money left over to go to a ball game and buy a hot dog and a beer. Then we will gladly stay off Wall Street.

    Dave Stancliff’s opinion? His column will be in tomorrow’s paper.

  19. Plain Jane
    October 8, 2011 at 12:32 pm

    Henry Giroux’ thoughtful view on OWS

    link

  20. Plain Jane
    October 8, 2011 at 12:48 pm

    “Wall Street didn’t write those failed policies (and) spend a trillion dollars.”

    He’s right, the legislators they funded and lobbied for that purpose did.

  21. pot math
    October 8, 2011 at 2:44 pm

    Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac bought politicians off with $170 million to create more subprime alt-a loans.

  22. Anonymous
    October 9, 2011 at 1:47 pm

    Interesting how the right (including comments on this blog) are totally dismissing the Occupy movement as “fringe” “stupid”, even “anti American” .
    It reminds me how the left was dismissive of the Tea Party – even to the point of believing the movement isn’t real, but the result of a Super Pac. Now the right believes Occupy is simply the manipulations of George Soros.
    The result is the left being totally blindsided by a powerful movement. The right doesn’t appear to be able to see what is right under their nose. A middle class that is outraged, whether it comes from a progressive or conservative perspective. The politician that gets this may actually have a chance to make some changes that actually benefit the majority of Americans – if that is truly what they want.

  23. Plain Jane
    October 9, 2011 at 2:13 pm

    The Tea Party (after the first couple of town hall meetings) IS the result of Super Pac funding. The right wing always accuses others of their own sins and project them onto others so it’s no surprise they are claiming Soros is behind OWS. So they’re lazy slackers looking for a hand out but also working for one of the richest men in the world — because he wants to pay higher taxes and have more regulation of his industry?

  24. Anonymous
    October 9, 2011 at 2:43 pm

    Sorry Jane I don’t believe that the entire Tea Party movement IS the result of SuperPac funding. Yes, they have helped fund and guide it, but that is not the reason that many middle class working Americans support that movement. As misguided as I think they are, many people who identify with the Tea Party are responding to similar frustrations with job opportunities and dwindling spending power. Will Obama, and a variety of other progressives try to ride and direct the Occupy movement – you bet.
    However, pointing fingers at the other side twill do nothing but please the 1% who prosper in a divide and conquer environment.
    As long as one side says it IS funded by a SuperPac and the other says it IS funded by George Soros not much will change. It will take a united middle class voice to cause change.

  25. Plain Jane
    October 9, 2011 at 3:18 pm

    You might have a point, 2:43, except the Tea Party is on the side of the 1%. What part of “taxed enough” don’t you understand? They aren’t asking the government to create jobs, they don’t believe govt. CAN create jobs and they certainly don’t support any sort of stimulus (other than tax cuts which don’t) to create them. Who do you think gave the House to the GOP obstructionists, caused a downgrade of our credit rating, is demanding the layoff of more public workers than the number of private jobs that are being created? What exactly do you think we have in common again?

  26. Plain Jane
    October 9, 2011 at 3:25 pm

    Maybe you can explain why, if the Tea Party is concerned about job creation, they have embraced Cain who claims people without wealth and jobs have only themselves to blame.

  27. Tea & Cracker Party Patriot
    October 9, 2011 at 5:16 pm

    Just convince me that you are a real Christian – you know the kind that has the balls to bomb the Muslims and execute congenital criminals and keep your woman in her place- and you’ll get my vote.

    And no more handouts for those other people. You know, the ones who aren’t like us. We invaded this place its ours now.

  28. Anonymous
    October 9, 2011 at 7:23 pm

    Jane,
    I think you missed my point. I don’t agree with the Tea Party – quite the opposite. However, I think their anger stems from the same conditions that have led to the “Occupy” movement. I won’t try to defend the Tea Party. However, I think vilifying them and assuming they are ALL driven by a SuperPac is counter productive. Let them know we are all (the 99%) in this together. That’s my point. If you tell them they are stupid and being bought by SuperPacs they will continue to support the 1% that is actually contributing to their problems.

  29. Lost_it
    October 10, 2011 at 8:31 am
  30. Plain Jane
    October 10, 2011 at 8:47 am

    You should read the essays that TRA has posted about the studies of the right wing authoritarian follower mindset, 7:23. If they could be swayed by facts, they would have already swayed.

    Here’s an update regarding specifically the Tea Party, but the entire book is available and linked at this site.

    http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~altemey/drbob/Comment%20on%20the%20Tea%20Party.pdf

  31. tra
    October 10, 2011 at 10:54 am

    The link P.J. posted refers to Dr. Robert Altemeyer, author, most recently, of “The Authoritarians.” The book is downloadable as a free PDF.

    http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~altemey/

    In his essay about the Tea Party (the one P.J. linked to) Altemeyer argues that a large number of Tea Party supporters are either classic right-wing authoritarian followers (as described in his book “The Authoritarians”), or are part of a slightly different group, the “other authoritarians,” which he calls the Social Dominators.

    The Social Dominators have a generally libertarian oritentation, with a particular emphasis on opposition to any attempts to increase equality, which they see as interfering with the “natural order” of dog-eat-dog competition by siphoning off the energy of the most successful people to subsidize those who the Social Dominators see as leeches on society.

  32. tra
    October 10, 2011 at 11:11 am

    Actually it would be more accurate to describe the Social Dominators of having a “pseudolibertarian” orientation, because of their willingness to partner with the right-wing authoritarians despite the blatantly anti-libertarian tendencies of the latter group.

    Basically it’s “as long as you support economic libertarianism, I’ll go along with the culture war, police state, foreign military adventures stuff.” Altemeyer describes the Tea Party base as an “uncomfortable marriage” between those two currents in right-wing thought.

  33. tra
    October 10, 2011 at 11:21 am

    Meanwhile, the Occupy Wall Street movement may be forging its own “uncomfortable marriage” between the loosely-organized, anti-hierarchical, left-libertarian protesters who launched the movement, and more traditional “institutional left” forces, including labor unions, issue advocacy organizations, etc.

    Mitch brought this article by Todd Gitlin to my attention:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/09/opinion/sunday/occupy-wall-street-and-the-tea-party.html?_r=1

  34. Plain Jane
    October 10, 2011 at 11:55 am

    That’s a good read, Tra.

  35. phyresong
    October 11, 2011 at 5:08 pm

    [embed]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8o3peQq79Q[\embed]

  36. phyresong
    October 11, 2011 at 5:11 pm

    Oops, I guess that didn’t work. How do I embed a video in a comment?

  37. Plain Jane
    October 11, 2011 at 5:17 pm

  38. Plain Jane
    October 11, 2011 at 5:21 pm

    Just pasting the link in the window works for me, Phyresong.

  39. phyresong
    October 11, 2011 at 5:29 pm

    PJ, thanks.

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