Home > Uncategorized > Federal courts to hear oral arguments on medical marijuana

Federal courts to hear oral arguments on medical marijuana


A decade after the Coalition for Rescheduling Cannabis (CRC) filed its petition seeking to have marijuana moved from Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act, the federal courts will finally review the scientific evidence regarding the therapeutic efficacy of marijuana. The DC Circuit Court of Appeals announced late last week that it will hear oral arguments in October in a lawsuit filed by Americans for Safe Access (ASA) to force the government to act.

–Phillip Smith

More here: http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/2012/jul/30/medical_marijuana_rescheduling_l

  1. August 6, 2012 at 10:01 am

    Why do we waste time and energy seeking justice from the most corrupt system since decadent Rome? What is that definition of insanity again? Something about expecting different results from the same action?
    It’s so depressing and sad to see those in prison for minor drug offenses having had their lives taken from them for participating in the only economy available to them. Children ripped from mother’s arms. Fathers, sons, daughters not allowed to communicate with each other for decades because they are “inmates.”
    The injustice taking place today makes the Dickensian stories of Victorian England look like a day in the park when compared with the horrific tales of courts and prosecutors knowingly convicting the innocent for political points. These are the real criminals. The worst kind of criminals, those who act under the cover of authority.
    There are a lot of bad people in prison. Killers, rapists, psychopaths. But there are many more on the street, able to act with impunity while our “justice” systems spends huge amounts of resources oppressing the poor, and imprisoning small time drug addicts.
    Our prisons-for-profit system constitutes crimes against humanity for the scope of its injustice against the poor and people of color.
    And we should go to this same system with hat in hand, begging them to be honest stewards of the law, forgetting their own elite, self-serving interests?

  2. HUUFC
    August 6, 2012 at 10:56 am

    I am unaware of anyone in prison for minor drug offenses. I have read of plea bargins that drop serious charges in exchange for prison time. Is that what you mean?

  3. Fact Checker
    August 6, 2012 at 1:03 pm

    In some states, like Texas, in the U.S.A., people serve 10, 20 year terms for minor pot possession.
    “Idaho, Delaware, Montana- Very harsh laws, lots of MMS guidelines.
    Apparently, it’s possible to get a life sentence with no possibility of parole for a pot conviction in Montana[/b]”

  4. What Now
    August 6, 2012 at 2:42 pm

    From HUUFC:
    “…I am unaware…”
    Fairly apt summation of your cognitive abilities.It’s been apparent to many of us for quite sometime.
    Have you joined a 12 step program or is this just an admission of new found awareness?

  5. Duh
    August 6, 2012 at 2:54 pm

    Cut him some slack What Now. Not everyone is a fucking genius like you.

  6. FUUHC
    August 6, 2012 at 3:32 pm

    If I listen to Fox news for information and refuse to do research, so what? Not everyone has critical thinking skills.

  7. High Finance
    August 6, 2012 at 3:53 pm

    No facts, no figures. You all are no more aware of “anyone in prison for minor drug offenses” than is HUUFC.

    So prove him wrong. If you can.

  8. Fact Checker
    August 6, 2012 at 4:25 pm

    “Idaho, Delaware, Montana- Very harsh laws, lots of MMS guidelines.
    Apparently, it’s possible to get a life sentence with no possibility of parole for a pot conviction in Montana“

  9. tra
    August 6, 2012 at 4:53 pm

    People sentenced to prison for marijuana possession alone account for less than 1% of inmates in state and federal prisons:

    “Prison inmates sentenced for marijuana possession account for 0.7 percent of state prisoners and 0.8 percent of federal prisoners (see Table). ”

    http://www.crimeandconsequences.com/crimblog/2011/06/facts-on-marijuana.html

    However, .7% of the state prison population plus .8% of the federal prison population is still thousands of people:

    Federal prisoners* (2010) 206,968 x .008 = 1,656

    State prisoners *(2010) 1,311,136 x .007 = 9,178

    So that’s over 10,500 people currently imprisoned for marijuana possession only.

    Of course this does not include those incarcerated in county jails, “boot camps,” etc.

    And I’m not sure if this includes people sent to prison for violating probation in cases where pot possession was the only violation.

    In my view, even one person imprisoned for marijuana possession would be one too many.

    ——————————————————————–

    *Statistics on number of inmates currently imprisoned in state and federal prisons in the U.S. are from:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incarceration_in_the_United_States

  10. tra
    August 6, 2012 at 4:58 pm

    Over 1,800. Sorry for the typo.

    Also, keep in mind that these are just the pot-possession-only cases, and don’t include small-time dealers, growers, etc.. And these figures don’t include people busted for possession or small-time distribution of any other drugs.

    So it seems to me that, yes, we’ve got a lot of people in prison for minor drug offenses. Though I guess that depends on your definition of “a lot” and “minor.”

  11. tra
    August 6, 2012 at 4:59 pm

    Ugh! Over 10,800, not 1,800!

  12. Mitch
    August 6, 2012 at 5:36 pm

    The Legislative Analysts Office estimates the cost of keeping someone in a California prison is about $47,000 per year. At that price, keeping 10,800 people imprisoned for pot possession costs the taxpayers $500 million per year and change. Is it worth that to punish people for possession of marijuana?

  13. What Now
    August 6, 2012 at 5:44 pm

    Mitch, for the modern inheritors of Puritanism, money spent in harsh retribution satisfies a lot of twisted psychological needs.
    These are, more often than not, the same inbred knucklescraping troglodytes that find giving a homeless individual with no income $120/month in food stamps to be an inexcusable waste of “their” tax money.

  14. tra
    August 6, 2012 at 5:58 pm

    And Mitch’s half-a-billion-per-year estimate doesn’t even include law enforcement costs, court costs, pre-trial jail costs, parole costs, lost productivity, and jail and probation costs for the many who aren’t sentenced to prison, but “only” jailed or put on probation, etc. So we’re talking about (at least ) tens of billions a year, all to arrest and punish people for possession of marijuana.

  15. Just Watchin
    August 6, 2012 at 5:59 pm

    Third strike pot offenders should be fried

  16. August 6, 2012 at 6:09 pm

    The drug offenses I was referring to are cocaine, and prescription drug possession. And you can add the burglaries and robberies addicts with no hope of treatment commit in order to supply their addictions. Drug addiction is the root cause of a whole host of crimes being committed. Our society has become a savage, selfish land of “one strike and you’re out.” Filling our prisons to the profit of wealthy shareholders.
    The “Jews for Hitler” crowd always scream that all those locked up “deserve” to be there. No surprise there.

  17. tra
    August 6, 2012 at 6:16 pm

    “Third strike pot offenders should be fried”

    Driving too fast causes thousands of deaths every year. So if you’re in favor of the death penalty for the victimless “crime” of pot possession, I assume you’re also in favor of the death penalty for people caught exceeding the speed limit?

  18. High Finance
    August 6, 2012 at 7:56 pm

    “Marijuana possession” could mean 1 little joint or 500 pounds.

    With prison overcrowding forcing Calif and other states to release many non-violent felons, It would be hard to imagine that “minor Marijuana possession” people, even if put in jail in the first place, are still there.

    Just Watching made a good point. How many of those in prison for Marijuana possession are there because of Third Strike where the first two strikes were not “minor”?

  19. tra
    August 6, 2012 at 8:06 pm

    ““Marijuana possession” could mean 1 little joint or 500 pounds.”

    Not really. If you have 500 lbs they’re going to charge you with intent to sell.

    “With prison overcrowding forcing Calif and other states to release many non-violent felons, It would be hard to imagine that “minor Marijuana possession” people, even if put in jail in the first place, are still there.”

    One would hope. I guess we’ll see when the 2011 & 2012 stats come out.

  20. Ted Wright
  21. Smart 5th Grader
    August 7, 2012 at 12:17 pm

    Highly Confused August 6, 2012 at 7:56 pm said:
    ““Marijuana possession” could mean 1 little joint or 500 pounds.”

    Ask a simplistic question, get a factual answer.
    How about just one American state, for example?

    “Marijuana Laws in Wyoming
    POSSESSION
    Under the influence or use misdemeanor 90 days $100
    3 oz or less misdemeanor 1 year $1,000
    More than 3 oz felony 5 years $10,000
    Within 500 feet of a school N/A N/A additional $500
    Possible conditional probation or discharge for first offense.
    CULTIVATION
    Any amount misdemeanor 6 months $1,000
    SALE
    Any amount felony 10 years $10,000
    To a minor at least three years younger than seller felony double penalty N/A
    Within 500 feet of a school felony 2 years MMS* $1,000
    MISCELLANEOUS
    Subsequent offenses are subject to double the possible penalties.
    DETAILS

    Using or being under the influence of marijuana is punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a fine up to $100.

    Possession of three ounces or less of marijuana is punishable by up to one year in jail and a fine up to $1,000. Possession of greater than three ounces carries a penalty of up to five years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. Any possession within 500 feet of a school increases the fine by $500. First offenders may be placed on conditional probation and may have the proceedings discharged.

    Cultivation of marijuana is punishable by up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.

    Sale or delivery of marijuana is punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a fine up to $10,000. Sale to a minor at least three years younger than the offender doubles the possible prison sentence. Sale within 500 feet of a school requires a mandatory minimum sentence of two years in prison and a fine up to $1,000.

    Second and subsequent offenses are subject to double the possible penalties.

    Conditional release: The state allows conditional release or alternative or diversion sentencing for people facing their first prosecutions. Usually, conditional release lets a person opt for probation rather than trial. After successfully completing probation, the individual’s criminal record does not reflect the charge.

    Mandatory minimum sentence: When someone is convicted of an offense punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence, the judge must sentence the defendant to the mandatory minimum sentence or to a higher sentence. The judge has no power to sentence the defendant to less time than the mandatory minimum. A prisoner serving an MMS for a federal offense and for most state offenses will not be eligible for parole. Even peaceful marijuana smokers sentenced to “life MMS” must serve a life sentence with no chance of parole.”

    http://www.kindgreenbuds.com/marijuana-laws/marijuanalaws_wyoming.html

  22. suzy blah blah
    August 7, 2012 at 8:04 pm

    What is that definition of insanity again? Something about expecting different
    results from the same action?

    -mDad, that pop saying is one of suzy’s pet peeves. Because it is NOT a correct definition of insanity. Those who believe it is, and use it as though it held a truth, are those who i define as being ignorant.

  23. August 7, 2012 at 9:26 pm

    You’re right, a more apt description would be constantly referring to one’s self in the third person.

  24. suzy blah blah
    August 7, 2012 at 9:48 pm

    -ironic that these trite and ill-informed attempts at defining insanity come from one who’s comments are often influenced by irrational anxiety and fear.

  25. What Now
    August 7, 2012 at 11:15 pm

    “You’re right, a more apt description would be constantly referring to one’s self in the third person.”
    RIGHT ON, Moviedad.
    Been thinking the same thing since “it” talked of itself returning from the Indian sub-continent to bring enlightenement to mere mortals.

  26. suzy blah blah
    August 7, 2012 at 11:46 pm

    -“it”? suzy doesn’t know what your talking about but i like it.

  27. Anonymous
    August 8, 2012 at 7:31 am

    A better word for people who do the same thing over and over but expect different results might be “delusional.” We don’t consider religious people who think prayer will bring a different outcome from the same efforts to be insane, but people who are delusional to the point of believing they are bringing spiritual enlightenment to the ignorant and refer to themselves in the third person aren’t very different from those who think they are Cleopatra or Napoleon. As a society we don’t label mass delusion as insanity, but it’s a very fine line.

  28. August 8, 2012 at 11:46 am

    Yeah, yeah. What a little dictator.

  29. suzy blah blah
    August 8, 2012 at 1:17 pm

    –it’s called literary ventriliquism, instead of throwing my voice i throw suzy’s words, LOL!

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