Home > Uncategorized > Locksmiths in Pamplona refuse to assist banks in evictions

Locksmiths in Pamplona refuse to assist banks in evictions

bankevictionsFrom the Guardian:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jan/05/pamplona-spain-banks-homes

The locksmiths’ rebellion follows several widely reported suicides by people about to be evicted from their homes. Amaia Egaña, a 53-year-old former socialist councillor in the northern town of Barakaldo, threw herself out of a window just as the court authorities – and their locksmith – were about to evict her in November.

“It wasn’t suicide,” demonstrators who marched through her town later that day shouted. “It was murder.”

  1. 4thStFlashr
    January 6, 2013 at 6:49 am

    The bankers will plunder until nothing is left of Spain, Greece, Ireland and countless other countries stuck in this centralized web of destruction. Nothing will be resolved until certain criminals go to jail and debt burdens are reset. The Euro seems to be doomed…..
    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-01-05/two-spaniards-self-immolate-due-financial-problems

  2. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 7:06 am

    I’m assuming that the phrase “debt burdens are reset” is liberal speak for income redistribution. Suicide is an extreme measure when confronted with the prospect that you can’t provide for yourself or your family. There was a time in The United States when people were so embarrassed by similar situations that they reacted in the same ways. Today, seeing how long you can live off of the government is the only job some will ever have, and they wear it like a badge of honor.

  3. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 7:27 am

    If you read the linked article, you can substitute the words “United States” for “Spain” and think you are reading an article about our own housing boom/bust period. I’ve never ubderstood how people freely signed on the dotted line for interest free, 3 and 5 year balloon, or no money down mortages, and when they couldn’t meet their obligation. it was the “evil banksters” at fault. I knew people that were refinancing two years into their loan and taking out equity to buy boats, motorcycles, and other “toys”. They were living the high life, using their homes as bottomless piggy banks. We’ve become a society that shuns responsibility for our own actions, and are happy to let the government pay for our poor decisions.

  4. January 6, 2013 at 7:40 am

    It wasn’t too long ago I learned of a younger friend who apparently got herself into hot water with a home loan. She told me her mortgage payment was something like $3000.00(!) a month, and it is NOT a big house. I didn’t have the nerve to ask how she got involved in it or why she agreed to sign up for a deal like that.

    She ended up moving out of the house for a few years and renting it out, although I never understood how anybody could afford to rent that house for $3k a month to make her payments for her. She moved back in to the house a year or two ago. I’ll have to remember to ask her how she managed to fix that mess.

  5. Ponder Z
    January 6, 2013 at 8:01 am

    I am so bored with this entitlement attitude form the socialists and liberal slow thinkers. These evictions are the fault of the borrower as much as any bank. If you are too stupid to understand an obligation of debt, you deserve to get tossed out on the street. So now the angry masses will protest and burn property and riot, to get some media notice on something they are the cause of. Oh, dont forget, someone in government lets these asshole vote too.

  6. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 8:09 am

    People believed the myth that house prices only go up and they were going up faster than wages (which were almost flat) so people fearful they were losing ground on the “American dream” of home ownership signed balloon payment mortgages in the belief that by the time the balloon payments came due they would be able to refinance their now more valuable house at lower interest rates. These risky mortgages inflated the housing bubble until it popped and those with balloon payments due couldn’t refinance because their homes were no longer worth what they owed. Millions more people irresponsibly used the paper equity in their homes to finance the increasing gap between what they were earning and the cost of their lifestyle. (This also kept the economy afloat until it sank.) The millions of job losses due to government and corporate policies caused millions of responsible people to lose their homes and almost everyone else to lose equity. And then the banks stopped lending.

  7. 4thStFlashr
    January 6, 2013 at 9:09 am

    Why should the tax payers support a broken banking system that caters to inside traders and Wall Street elite turd bags? And how does the government pay back 16 trillion in debt, while obligating itself w/more future unfunded liability debt? Our deficit will never be repaid……the Fed is on a Kamikazi mission.

  8. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 9:44 am

    #6, excellent assessment. I watched friends and relatives buy bigger homes, newer cars, etc, all on the bet their future income and home values would be more. For the most part, they are victims of their own desires. i have a hard time blaming the banks that loaned the money. Some have lost their homes, others are slaves to huge payments with no end in sight. I always wondered how people in my neighborhood could afford these $40,000 cars plus one for the kid, a boat, and the 50″ flat screens. And no health insurance, of course. I think our priorities are out of whack.

  9. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 9:44 am

    It won’t be without growth Flasher. Growth requires investment to create well paying jobs which pay more in taxes and fuel the consumption which creates more jobs. If you don’t have savings and investment is necessary to survive, you take on debt. Where to invest for the best return for the country should be the basis of the discussion, not whether to invest.

  10. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 9:56 am

    The people who used their home equity to inflate their lifestyles get no sympathy from me, #8. I was referring to those whose earnings had been stagnating (or disappearing) as the cost of living went up, their previously affordable lifestyles less affordable and easy credit a reasonable temporary bridge until the economy picked up – just a few trickles away now… I wonder at what point it would have all crashed without all that personal debt greasing the wheels.

  11. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 10:14 am

    This is why things aren’t improving faster and why Paul Krugman should be Treasury Secretary: http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/01/06/1176322/-Austerity-Kabuki#

  12. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 10:42 am

    Just where I’d look for my economic direction…….the Daily Kos. Are you kidding me? Besides…..Krugman is an idiot, and the head cheerleader for the tax and spend what you don’t have crowd.

  13. Mitch
    January 6, 2013 at 10:48 am

    While the Herald’s crop of conservatives are pleased to go with “blame-the-victim,” Matt Taibbi seems to get it: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/secret-and-lies-of-the-bailout-20130104

  14. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 11:23 am

    If you had read the article you would be reminded that Krugman has been right all along. If you had been reading Krugman you would already know this and wouldn’t be embarrassing yourself again.

  15. Mitch
    January 6, 2013 at 11:31 am

    Paul Krugman, speaking on the game show “Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me”:

    SAGAL: You started with the New York Times around 1999, if not mistaken, writing about economic issues primarily. And you became very well known and very influential. You won the Nobel Prize. By the way, winning the Nobel Prize, does that shut up one’s critics?

    KRUGMAN: Well, no, it doesn’t shut them up. I mean, but it does mean that people stop saying that you’re an idiot for about two weeks.

    (LAUGHTER)

    It probably didn’t take JW two weeks — he’s an efficiency expert.

  16. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 11:36 am

    Funny thing….. I read several articles where Krugman referred to other Nobel winners as idiots, but he wouldn’t say who he was talking about.

  17. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 11:45 am

    Just a short personal “entitlement mentality” story: When I was still working, I had an opening that I wanted to fill ASAP. My local manager conducted the preliminary interviews, pared the prospect list to three, and I flew in for the final interviews.
    After the interviews, we agreed that “Joe” was a great fit for the job, and called him to meet us the next morning. At that meeting, I explained the compensation package, which was approx. $60,000 annually, with a company provided car. I knew that he had been out of work for quite a while, so I expected him to jump at the opportunity. When I told him we wanted him to start the next Monday, his reply was….” could we put back the start date a little? I’m still eligible for two more weeks of unemployment”. He didn’t get the job.

  18. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 11:59 am

    Your “great fit for the job” was a lazy idiot (giving you the benefit of the doubt that this unlikely event actually occurred) and that doesn’t say much for your judgment Watchin.

  19. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 12:03 pm

    Anonymous :
    Your “great fit for the job” was a lazy idiot (giving you the benefit of the doubt that this unlikely event actually occurred) and that doesn’t say much for your judgment Watchin.

    I’m guessing you’re an expert on the “lazy idiot” part Anon. Now got out and wait by the mailbox for your welfare check.

  20. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 12:11 pm

    It’s Sunday and I don’t work on Sundays. The mail doesn’t come on Sundays either but it never brings me anything but pay checks when it does run. Your company thinking a lazy idiot was a great fit explains why you did so well there.

  21. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 12:14 pm

    LOL……now libtards are calling welfare “paychecks”

  22. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 12:17 pm

    Do you dispute that your “great fit” was an idiot or that he was lazy? What would you call someone who has been out of work for a long time who would rather get at most $900 (in CA) for 2 weeks for laying around than $2000 for working?

  23. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 12:25 pm

    Do you really think your smears are meaningful debate Watchin? How could you possibly know anything about my source of income? Since you obviously can’t, your irrational smears show you have no rational debate. You are the one claiming that people are inherently lazy if they aren’t forced by circumstance to work, not me. I wouldn’t hire anyone who said they wanted to let their unemployment benefits run out before they took the job either because it would demonstrate dishonesty, laziness and stupidity, traits that are usually easy to spot before you get to the point of offering them the job.

  24. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 12:26 pm

    Definitely lazy, but smart enough to live off the government

  25. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 12:35 pm

    Anonymous :
    Do you really think your smears are meaningful debate Watchin? How could you possibly know anything about my source of income? Since you obviously can’t, your irrational smears show you have no rational debate. You are the one claiming that people are inherently lazy if they aren’t forced by circumstance to work, not me. I wouldn’t hire anyone who said they wanted to let their unemployment benefits run out before they took the job either because it would demonstrate dishonesty, laziness and stupidity, traits that are usually easy to spot before you get to the point of offering them the job.

    Many job seekers are excellent and very believable interviews. It’s obvious that you’ve never been in a position to have to hire people. But there’s no shame in flipping burgers for a living. I see a promotion to fry cook in your future!

  26. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 12:43 pm

    Anonymous :
    Your “great fit for the job” was a lazy idiot (giving you the benefit of the doubt that this unlikely event actually occurred) and that doesn’t say much for your judgment Watchin.

    By the way Anon……you started the smearing.

  27. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 12:49 pm

    Are you really defending someone who said they would commit perjury on their unemployment forms to defraud a state program in order to laze about for 2 weeks for a lot less money than they would receive by working? Calling such a person a lazy idiot isn’t a smear. It is the truth.

  28. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 1:04 pm

    Anon……I’ll talk slowly so that you can follow. I didn’t defend this moron. I’m sure that he assumed if the start date couldn’t be put back that he’d just say “ok…..I’ll start Monday”. I just didn’t give him the chance. And the initial smear here was your comment about my judgment.

  29. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 1:57 pm

    Mitch :
    While the Herald’s crop of conservatives are pleased to go with “blame-the-victim,” Matt Taibbi seems to get it: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/secret-and-lies-of-the-bailout-20130104

    What do you say to those people who have their whole lifestyle based on credit, “you were a victim”? I feel bad, but the writing was on the wall. You can’t continuously spend more than you make, hoping for a break in the future. These aren’t people who were barely making it, they chose to buy bigger things than they could afford. Couldn’t live in an older neighborhood, or gasp, a trailer park. Too good for that. Can’t drive a used car, lease a brand new one for $500 month. Kids have to have the new iPhone, and the $100 jeans.

    At least those are the people I know of that lost their homes. I am sure there are a bunch that were first time homebuyers that took on bigger loans than they could afford too, but that does not excuse them from understanding the basic concept of spending less than you make. I assume they were paying rent and understood their payment would be more than they were paying, especially after the interest only period.

  30. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 2:11 pm

    It isn’t a smear if its true. You seem to understand that sort of slacker mentality better than I do but I’ve never received unemployment or welfare, not even a government paycheck and most people I know would rather chew nails than be unemployed.

  31. Just Watchin
    January 6, 2013 at 2:21 pm

    Anonymous :
    It isn’t a smear if its true. You seem to understand that sort of slacker mentality better than I do but I’ve never received unemployment or welfare, not even a government paycheck and most people I know would rather chew nails than be unemployed.

    Anon…..you’re flipping burgers and I retired at 58 with seven figures of net worth. Better put down that pipe for a while.

  32. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 2:57 pm

    Since you assume that other people lie about themselves and are lazy cheats when they can get away with it, it looks like you are projecting your own character flaws onto others.

  33. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 3:01 pm

    I’ve done the same work my entire adult life and it has nothing to do with food service, but keep smearing when you can’t debate. It’s so convincing.

  34. Mitch
    January 6, 2013 at 3:15 pm

    #29,

    Of course there are people who are to blame for their own misfortunes. There’s a big but, though.

    When I was growing up, bankers had a fiduciary responsibility not to assist people in getting in over their heads. In the post-Reagan “regulation is bad” environment, bank loan officers were salesmen operating on commission, and handing out money to people who couldn’t really afford the loans became big business. So there’s plenty of blame to spread around.

    The article in the post is about Spain — in Spain, the banks were loaning 120% on properties. Sure, people who took those loans were foolish, but that’s the whole point of regulation: to keep people from being suckered by too-good-to-be-true deals. The banks were fully protected, of course — people in Spain now have no legal way out of the debts, even while the banks everywhere have been bailed out.

    What we are looking at, both here and around the world, is yet another situation where the bastards who created the problem are escaping unscathed and proud of their money, while the “little people” are screwed. It’s injustice, pure and simple.

    There are no easy solutions, but the beginning of a solution is a change in the understanding of what “wealth” means. Money is this odd fungible entity, which is great in some respects. But we need to learn that just because someone has money doesn’t mean they got it by honest means, and just because someone doesn’t have money doesn’t mean they are somehow inadequate.

    Great wealth, unless it is being put to some use beyond individual gratification, is just a sign of a diseased mind. Were it not money but newspapers instead, it would be diagnosed as obsessive hoarding. I have absolutely no problem with someone accumulating millions of dollars — but any society that allows individuals or families to accumulate hundreds of millions of dollars in an era when many are still starving… that society is insane. For the people with hundreds of millions to be genuinely upset at their tax bills is just the cherry on top.

    There has to be some way for people to know they’ve won the game. Maybe a certificate from the President or the Pope or the Queen of England saying “you win” might do the trick.

    I watched “The Queen of Versailles” on Netflix the other day. I felt sorry for the Siegels, but not sorry enough not to recommend the movie as a cautionary tale.

  35. jr
    January 6, 2013 at 3:25 pm

    Mitch: You might read Gretchen Morgenson’s column in today’s N.Y. Times “Surprise, Surprise: The Banks Win”

  36. Mitch
    January 6, 2013 at 3:35 pm

    Thanks, JR. Yes, she ends with “New year, same story.”

    In Orwell’s 1984, the symbol of complete victory by fascism was when Winston Smith could sincerely say that “he loved big brother.”

    I agree the banks have won… I expect big money will always win, or at least will continue to win pretty much all the time. And it’s got to the point where the tea folks love the banks and their enablers. But the victory is not yet 100%. Not sure why that matters, but it still feels like it does.

  37. 4thStFlashr
  38. Anonymous
  39. Mitch
    January 6, 2013 at 5:52 pm

    Thanks #37. Lordy, I think I’ve met components of The Blob from time to time. Some of the low level membership loves going to conferences.

    Matt Taibbi is a national treasure.

  40. jr
    January 6, 2013 at 5:57 pm

    I agree. His current Rolling Stone article needs to be read by people that never read Rolling Stone.

  41. Anonymous
    January 6, 2013 at 6:32 pm

    And this explains why people keep electing them

    http://trueslant.com/matttaibbi/2009/04/14/americas-peasant-mentality/

  42. Just Watchin
    January 7, 2013 at 6:43 am

    Anonymous :And this explains why people keep electing them
    http://trueslant.com/matttaibbi/2009/04/14/americas-peasant-mentality/

    A true example of the Low Information Voter: post a link to an article that is nearly four years old. Here’s a news flash #41……..Japan just attacked Pearl Harbor !!!

  43. Anonymous
    January 7, 2013 at 7:36 am

    Do you think people have changed their basic characters in 4 years Watchin? Did you read it? Your train of thought is derailed.

  44. Just Watchin
    January 7, 2013 at 8:07 am

    Anonymous :Do you think people have changed their basic characters in 4 years Watchin? Did you read it? Your train of thought is derailed.

    It was just a typical libtard article of name calling. But to answer your question: yes, I believe that a segment of people have changed their character in the last four years. Much more an entitlement mentality. Far more takers than makers. People electing politicians based on the “free stuff” they get promised. It’s very sad.

  45. Scooter
    January 7, 2013 at 9:09 am

    In Spain if you default on a home loan even if the bank repossess the real estate, you still owe the full amount of the loan. You owe that loan for the rest of your life, whether you retain possession of the real estate or not. The banks have structured the law so they always win.

  46. Anonymous
    January 7, 2013 at 1:02 pm

    “It was just a typical libtard article of name calling.”

    Don’t you think it’s just a wee bit hypocritical to complain of “name calling” while also using the term “libtard” to refer to those you don’t agree with?

  47. Just Watchin
    January 7, 2013 at 1:15 pm

    Anonymous :
    “It was just a typical libtard article of name calling.”
    Don’t you think it’s just a wee bit hypocritical to complain of “name calling” while also using the term “libtard” to refer to those you don’t agree with?

    No

  48. March 7, 2013 at 10:47 am

    Really interesting story! I hope that that locksmith is like a locksmith in Surrey I know who is the nicest guy on the planet.

  49. April 25, 2013 at 11:02 am

    Some locksmiths prefer not to deal with the banks as they pay structure is low and normally a 30-90 net pay. I deal with a Locksmith in Boca Raton”> and they have no problem with this structure.

  50. April 25, 2013 at 11:03 am

    Anonymous :
    Some locksmiths prefer not to deal with the banks as they pay structure is low and normally a 30-90 net pay. I deal with a Locksmith in Boca Raton; and they have no problem with this structure.

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